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Challenges of Advanced Future Studies: The Post-Pandemic Era and Co-Creative Power

Research Topic
Challenges of Advanced Future Studies: The post-pandemic era and co-creative power

Lead Researcher
Masatoshi Murase, Associate Professor, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University

Joint Researchers
Yoshinori Hiroi, Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University

Tadashi Nishihira, Professor, Graduate Schools Education, Kyoto University

Kayo Hirakawa, Professor, Institute for Liberal Arts and Sciences, Kyoto University

Collaborating Researchers
Kohei Shiota, Former President, Shiga University of Medical Science / Former Vice-President, Kyoto University

Juichi Yamagiwa, Director-General, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature / Former President, Kyoto University

Masafumi Yano, Former Director-General, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University

Terufumi Ohno, Former Director, Mie Prefectural Museum / Kyoto University Museum

Kunihiro Matsuki, Professor Emeritus, Graduate School of Education, Kyoto University

Naoko Saito, Professor, Graduate School of Education, Kyoto University

Tomohiro Akiyama, Visiting Researcher, Graduate School of Education, Kyoto University

Mitsuko Yorizumi, Professor, Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology, University of Tokyo

Kiyoshi Miyakawa, Professor, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo

Takashi Kumon, Professor, Institute for Asian Studies, Asia University

Yoko Kobayashi, Specially Appointed Professor, Disaster Nursing, Japanese Red Cross Toyota College of Nursing

Yoshiyuki Mitsui, Professor, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kindai University

Makoto Kurata, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo

Aine Mori, Hospital Art Director, Shikoku Medical Center for Children and Adults

Tomoko Murase, Professor / Dean, Japanese Red Cross Toyota College of Nursing

Manabu Fukuda, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Modern Society and Culture

Tsutomu Nishimura, Program-Specific Associate Professor, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Kyoto University Hospital

Masahiro Terada, Program-Specific Associate Professor, Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University

Sadafusa Takaya, Former Teacher, Senior High School Attached to Kyoto University of Education

Yachiyo Takemori, Vice-President, Iwakuni Nurcing College

Kiriko Yoshimura, Graduate student, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University

Ikumi Ogi, Graduate student, Graduate School of Management, Kyoto University

Yoshitaka Iwasaki, Graduate student, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies

 

 

Since the beginning of the 21st century, modern society has entered an era of hyper-globalization due to the remarkable development of science and technology. Such a society has been called a huge “complex system” where people, technology, politics, and the economy are intertwined with each other, and the world economy has seemed to be growing steadily.

 

However, the true nature of this “complex system,” which operates far beyond human understanding, is hidden. The subsystems of this “complex system” also have significant complexity. As a result, climate change, large-scale disasters, conflicts, and terrorism have revealed situations in which the optimization of a certain system increases the vulnerability of another system, leading to the failure of the entire system. Furthermore, the COVID-19 pandemic is currently shaking the world. All of these can be considered crises of catastrophe and collapse lurking in the “complex system.”

 

It is precisely because we are currently facing such a crisis that we need to pay attention to other aspects of the “complex system,” for example, the “resilience” of nature that supports this huge system, the “learning from failure” that is inherent in humanity, and the “ability to endure unanswerable situations,” namely, “negative capability.” The essence of these aspects is the power of co-creation, which paradoxically avoids large-scale catastrophes by repeating small “collapses” and opening up new “creations.”

 

These “collapses” and “creations” are paradoxically related through different aspects of the same huge “complex system.” Thus, the phenomenon of problem emergence in “complex systems” is the essence of understanding certain problems and can be used as a methodology for problem solving. In this project, we will co-create simple laws, universal principles, and theory establishment across disciplines by paradoxically using the phenomenon of emergence as a methodology for various issues in “complex systems,” which are found in various academic fields.

2021/09/29

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