UEHIRO Events

Symposium · Lecture · Workshop Archive

23rd Seminar on Bhutan (Families and Livelihoods in Pre-modern Bhutan)

The department of Bhutanese Studies (Uehiro Research Division) at Kokoro research Center has regularly organized Seminar on Bhutan. In the 23rd Seminar, the honorable guest speaker Sir (Dasho) Karma Ura (Presient, Centre for Bhutan Studies and GNH Research) will talk about Families and Livelihoods in Pre-modern Bhutan.

 

[Date] 5 (Wed.) February 2020

[Time] 17:00-18:30 (Open 16:30)

[Place] Kokoro Research Center’s Seminar Room (ground floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center

    (46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)

   MAP  http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en2/access-en/#honkan

  [Guest Speaker] Sir (Dasho) Karma Ura (President, Centre for Bhutan Studies and GNH Research)

  [Title] “Families and Livelihoods in Pre-modern Bhutan”

  [Convener] Dr. Seiji Kumagai (Uehiro Associate Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)

 

  *Language: English

  **Attendance: limitted to 20 people

  ***Fee: free of charge

 

[Contact] Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, 46 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 Japan.

Tel: 075-753-9681    Mail: kokoro-bh[at]mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp 

 

22nd Seminar on Himalayan Religion (International Symposium: “Tibetan Survival Strategies for the Weak: History, Philosophy, Culture and Contemplative Practice of the Bon Religion”)

 

Date: Fri. 17 January 2020

Time: 15:00-19:00 (*Open 14:30)

Place: Medium Seminar Room (3rd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center

(46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)

MAP: http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en2/access-en/

 

Time Schedule

15:00-15:05  Introduction

15:05-15:30  History of Bon: Shin’ichiro MIYAKE (Otani University) in Japanese

15:30-15:55  Philosophy of Bon: Seiji KUMAGAI (Kyoto University) in Japanese

15:55-16:20  Modern Culture of Bon: Kengo KONISHI (Kanazawa Seiryo University) in Japanese

16:20-16:40  Break

16:40-17:30  Ancient Culture/Rituals of Bon: Daniel Berounský (Charles University) in English

17:30-17:40  Break

17:40-18:30  Tantrayana of Bon: Nima Hojer LAMA (Charles University) in English

18:30-18:55  Dzogchen Meditation of Bon: Takahiko HAKODERA (Dzogchen practitioner) *in Japanese

18:55-19:00  Conclusions

 

 

*Language: Japanese and English

**Attendance: limited to 50 people

***Fee: free of charge

Contact: Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, 46 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 Japan.

Tel: 075-753-9681 Mail: kokoro-bh*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please replace * with @.)

 

Abstract

The department of Bhutanese Studies, Uehiro Research Division at Kokoro Research Center has regularly organized Seminars on Himalayan Religion. In the 22nd Seminar, we will hold the International Symposium: “Tibetan Survival Strategies for the Weak: History, Philosophy, Culture and Contemplative Practice of the Bon Religion”.

Though Tibet is worldly famous for being a Buddhist country, the existence of an earlier indigenous religion known as Bon is often unnoticed by non-specialists. Bon became a minority religion in the 8th century when Buddhism turned into the state religion of Tibet. Despite unfavorable circumstances, including direct repression a times, Bon has been able to survive throughout the centuries resorting to clever and peaceful strategies. This religion might provide us with some clues on how to survive in this current hard-to-live world. The symposium examines the history, philosophy, culture and contemplative practice of the Bon Religion to learn “Tibetan Survival Strategies for the Weak”.

 

 

Special Lecture Series on Asian Culture

Dzongkha Language Seminar for Beginners

Hosted by the Kokoro Research Center, The Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education’s Bhutanese Studies Research Laboratory

 

 

Lecturer: Yoshiro Imaeda (Specially Appointed Professor)

Coordinator: Seiji Kumagai (Divisional Director of Uehiro Research Division, Program-Specific Associate Professor)

 

Bhutan, a Himalayan kingdom whose national focus is on creating “Gross National Happiness,” has a variety of cultures and languages.

As a result of its national policy regarding English language education, many Bhutanese people can speak English. However, their national language is Dzongkha, which is used in important speeches and documents.

In this seminar, which was held September 17 – 21, 2019, the participants learned the basic grammar of Dzongkha and engaged in simple conversations.

 

 

Dates & Time:

September 17th: 13:00-18:00

from September 18th – 21st, 2019: 10:30-17:00

Location: Kyoto University’s Inamori Foundation Center, 1st Floor Seminar Room

Qualifications for taking courses: none required but priority was given to applicants who had completed Tibetan grammar and could attend each class session.

Fee: Free of Charge

Hosted by the Kokoro Research Center, The Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education’s Bhutanese Studies Research Laboratory

21st Seminar on Himalayan Religion (To Be a Shaman among the Sherdukpens, West-Kameng District, Arunachal Pradesh) among the Shertukpens)

The department of Bhutanese Studies, Uehiro Research Division at Kokoro Research Center has regularly organized Seminars on Himalayan Religion. In the 21st Seminar, the honorable guest speaker Dr. Pascale Dollfus (Chargée de recherché, CNRS) will talk about the Shaman among the Sherdukpens, West-Kameng District, Arunachal Pradesh in India.

 

Date: Tue. 24 December 2019

Time: 17:00-19:00

Place: Medium Seminar Room (3rd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center

                            (46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)                  

MAP: http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en2/access-en/#honkan

Guest Speaker: Dr. Pascale Dollfus (Chargée de recherché, CNRS)

Tentative title: To Be a Shaman among the Sherdukpens, West-Kameng District, Arunachal Pradesh.

 

*Language: in English with Japanese translation

**Attendance: limited to 50 people

***Fee: free of charge

Contact: Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, 46 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 Japan.

Tel: 075-753-9681 Mail: kokoro-bh*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please replace * with @.)

 

Abstract

The Sherdukpens or more accurately Sertukpens, are a population of about 4,000 who live in West Kameng district in the State of Arunachal Pradesh (“The Land of Dawn-Lit Mountains”), located in North-East India. They are referred to as Buddhists in the Indian census.

Buddhism was introduced among Sherdukpens in the mid-18th century. Today there are small Buddhist temples, stūpas, and prayer walls in almost every village. Most Sherdukpens have Buddhist names and, for funerals, they call upon Buddhist monks and married priests who, for the most part, are natives of Bhutan or the Tawang region. In fact, up until the last decade, there were no Sherdukpens among the Buddhist clergy. It was obviously not their concern.

Today Buddhism is still considered a foreign religion, quite different from the local religion which is qualified by those who speak English as “naturalistic” because all the gods, spirits, and demons inhabit elements of the landscape: mountains, forests, rocks, rivers, caves, and so forth. These invisible forces fall into two broad categories: good or potentially benevolent spirits, referred to as lo and including ancestral deities (khiks), and evil spirits or demons called dẽ. Associated with dẽ because of their malicious power and the fear they spread, bising are spectral figures whose appearance and size change at whim.

Three religious experts are responsible for smoothing out any difficulties in the cohabitation between spirits and men, and sometimes among men themselves through the intervention of a spirit:

khikzizis, who are priests dedicated to cults of ancestral deities (khiks) and carry out community rituals;

zizis, who are household priests and perform rituals centered on the individual and the family; and

raomas (or raomats), who are shamans and are regarded as “super zizis”.

It is the last of these who interest me here and to whom I’ll be devoting my lecture. I’ll be describing how one doesn’t decide to be a raoma – one is ‘caught’ by a deity –, and I’ll be recounting a séance I was lucky to attend, backed by photos and videos. The raoma is not just an intercessor; he travels to the nonhuman world to meet the spirits, to talk to them and even fight them. Only his “bodily envelope” stays in the house where he operates.

 

20th Seminar on Himalayan Religion (1. Doing Art with Traditional Nepalese Lokta Paper; 2. The Four Signs of Mahāmudrā Meditation―The Prevailing Topic in Karma Phrin las pa’s Dohā Commentary)

The department of Bhutanese Studies, Uehiro Research Division at Kokoro Research Center has regularly organized Seminars on Himalayan Religion. In the 20th Seminar, our guest speaker Prof. Dr. Klaus Dieter Mathes will give a lecture about the four signs of Mahāmudrā meditation of Kagyu tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. German artist Ms. Dagmar Mathes will talk about doing art with traditional Nepalese Lokta paper.

Date: Thurs. 19 December 2019

Time: 17:00-19:00

Place: Medium Seminar Room (3rd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center

                            (46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)                  

MAP:http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en2/access-en/#honkan

Guest Speaker 1: Ms. Dagmar Mathes (Artist)

Title: “Doing Art with Traditional Nepalese Lokta Paper”

Abstract: Handmade from plant-fibers, lokta paper matches my preference for natural working material and has shaped the expression of my paintings.

 

Guest Speaker 2: Prof. Klaus-Dieter Mathes (Professor, Department of South Asian, Tibetan and Buddhist Studies, University of Vienna)

Title: The Four Signs of Mahāmudrā Meditation―The Prevailing Topic in Karma Phrin las pa’s Dohā Commentary

Abstract: In his commentary on Saraha’s Peoples’ Dohās (dMangs do hā), Karma Phrin las pa (1456-1539) repeatedly comments on various subjects in terms of the “four signs” (brda bzhi) of Mahāmudrā meditation, i.e., mindfulness (dran pa), beyond mindfulness (dran med), non-arising (skye med), and transcending the intellect (blo ‘das). Of particular interest is Karma Phrin las pa’s four sign interpretation of Saraha’s dohā on gaṇacakra, which prescribes the four tantric activities of “(1) eating, (2) drinking, (3) union, and (4) filling the cakras.” According to Karma Phrin las pa’s secret explanation, one eats the perceived object (grāhya) through mindfulness, drinks the perceiving mind (grāhaka) through leaving mindfulness behind, and enjoys union with emptiness through non-arising. The result of this profound deconstruction, the transcending of the intellect, allows for the emergence of co-emergent wisdom. It will be shown that the Karma Phrin las pa’s repetitive topic of the four signs has its origin in literature attributed to Maitrīpa (986-1063) and his disciple Pha dam pa Sangs rgyas.

 

*Language: in English with Japanese translation

**Attendance: limited to 50 people

***Fee: free of charge

Contact: Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, 46 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 Japan.

Tel: 075-753-9681 Mail: kokoro-bh*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please replace * with @.)

 

 

19th Seminar on Himalayan Religion (The Nature and Role of Consciousness in the Tibetan Great Perfection (Dzogchen) Philosophy)

The department of Bhutanese Studies, Uehiro Research Division at Kokoro Research Center has regularly organized Seminars on Himalayan Religion. In the 19th Seminar, the honorable guest speaker Dr. David Higgins (Visiting Fellow, International College for Postgraduate Buddhist Studies) will talk about the nature and role of consciousness in the Tibetan great perfection (Dzogchen) philosophy.

 

Date: Mon. 2 December 2019

Time: 17:00-19:00

Place: Medium Seminar Room (3rd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center

                            (46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)                  

MAP:http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en2/access-en/#honkan 

Guest Speaker: Dr. David Higgins (Visiting Fellow, International College for Postgraduate Buddhist Studies)

Tentative title: The Nature and Role of Consciousness in the Tibetan Great Perfection (Dzogchen) Philosophy

 

*Language: in English with Japanese translation

**Attendance: limited to 50 people

***Fee: free of charge

Contact: Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, 46 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 Japan.

Mail: kokoro-bh*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please replace * with @.)

 

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Abstract

This lecture will focus on the nature and role of consciousness in the philosophy of the Great Perfection (Dzogchen) tradition of the Ancient (Nyingma) school of Tibetan Buddhism. The Dzogchen philosophy of mind rests on a principal distinction between dualistic mind (sems) and primordial awareness (ye shes) which the tradition has deemed indispensable for understanding its distinctive views and practices. After considering how some of the tradition’s leading scholars characterized mind and primordial awareness in relation to Chinese and Indian Buddhist traditions during the post-Imperium Era of Fragmentation (9th–10th centuries), we will look at how it came to be regarded as a defining element of Dzogchen thought and practice. To this end, we will look at some of the key philosophical arguments that were used to justify the distinction in the classical period (12th to 14th centuries). The lecture concludes with an exploration of how the distinction was used in Dzogchen path hermeneutics to reconcile traditional gradualist and non-gradualist models of the Buddhist path and briefly considers some of its implications for contemporary studies of consciousness.

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22nd Seminar on Bhutan/18th Seminar on Himalayan Religion (International Workshop on Himalayan Law, Politics and Buddhist Ethics)

The department of Bhutanese Studies, Uehiro Research Division at Kokoro Research Center has regularly organized “Seminars on Bhutan” and “Seminars on Himalayan Religion”. For the 22nd Seminar on Bhutan/18th Seminar on Himalayan Religion, we will organize an “International Workshop on Himalayan Law, Politics and Buddhist Ethics.”

 

Date: Thurs. 12 September 2019

Time: 14:00-17:00

Place: Seminar Room (1st floor) of Kokoro Research Center at Kyoto University Inamori Center, Kyoto University, Japan

(46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)                    

MAP: http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en2/access-en/

 

Program:

14:00-14:15  “Introduction: Himalayan Law, Politics and Buddhist Ethics”

                              Seiji Kumagai (Uehiro Associate Professor, Kyoto University)

14:15-14:45  “The Black-Slate Edict: Legitimacy and Order”

                                Michaela Windisch-Graetz (Professor, University of Vienna)

14:45-15:15  “Approach and Objectives from Legal Philosophy”

                               Miguel Alvarez-Ortega (Associate Professor, University of Seville)

15:15-15:30  Break

15:30-16:00  “Geography of power in post-1885 Bhutan: British perspectives”

                               Matteo Miele (JSPS International Research Fellow, Kyoto University)

16:00-17:00  Discussion

 

Registration: Please send email to the following email address.

Mail: kokoro-bh*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please replace * with @.)

 

*Language: English

**Attendance: limited to 20 people

***Fee: free of charge

Contact: Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, 46 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 Japan.

Mail: kokoro-bh*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please replace * with @.)

21st Seminar on Bhutan (Bhutan’s Modern Society)

21 st Seminar on Bhutan (Bhutan’s Modern Society)

The department of Bhutanese Studies, Uehiro Research Division at Kokoro Research
Center has regularly organized “Seminars on Bhutan” and “Seminars on Himalayan
Religion”. In the 21 st Seminar on Bhutan, Dr. Seiji Kumagai will give a lecture on
Bhutan’s modern society.

Date: Wed. 19 September 2018
Time: 13:00-18:00
Place: Small Conference Room (3rd floor) of Kokoro Research Center at Kyoto University
Inamori Center
(46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)
MAP: http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/AboutUs/access.html
Speaker: Seiji Kumagai (Divisional Director, Uehiro Associate Professor, Uehiro
Research Division, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)
Title: Bhutan’s Modern Society
Registration: Please send email to the following email address.
Mail: kokoro-bh*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please replace * with @.)
*Language: English
**Attendance: limited to 30 people
***Fee: free of charge
Contact: Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, 46 Yoshida
Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 Japan.
Tel: 075-753-9681 Mail: kokoro-bh*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please replace * with @.)

13th Lecture on Bhutanese Culture (The Clash between Modernization and Tradition in Bhutan) *with a Partial Preview of the Documentary Film “The Next Guardian”

13th Lecture on Bhutanese Culture (The Clash between Modernization and Tradition in Bhutan) *with a Partial Preview of the Documentary Film “The Next Guardian”
The department of Bhutanese Studies (Uehiro Research Division) at Kokoro research Center has regularly organized Lectures of Bhutanese Culture. In the 13th Lecture and Workshop, the honorable guest speakers Mr. Arun Bhattarai and Ms. Dorottya Zurbo (Movie Directors) will talk about the clash between modernization and tradition, especially about their documentary film “The Next Guardian” focusing on the intergenerational gap in Bhutan, including discussion with discussants.

picture_13rd Lecture on Bhutanese Culture (2018.07.13)のコピー.png
[Date] 13 (Fri.) July 2018
[Time] 17:00-18:30
[Place] Grand Seminar Room (3rd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center
(46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)
MAP http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/AboutUs/access.html
[Guest Speakers] Mr. Arun Bhattarai and Ms. Dorottya Zurbo (Movie Director)
[Title] “The Clash between Modernization and Tradition in Bhutan: Especially Focusing on the Intergenerational Gap in Bhutan” (*with partial preview of their documentary film “The Next Guardian”)
[Convener] Dr. Seiji Kumagai (Uehiro Associate Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)
*Language: in English with Japanese translation
**Attendance: limited to 100 people
***Fee: free of charge
[Contact] Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, 46 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 Japan.
Tel: 075-753-9681 Mail: kokoro-bh[at]mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp

12th Lecture on Bhutanese Culture (Bhutan and GNH (Gross National Happiness))

12th Lecture on Bhutanese Culture (Bhutan and GNH (Gross National Happiness))
Bhutan and Gross National Happiness
bhutan12e.jpg
The department of Bhutanese Studies (Uehiro Research Division) at Kokoro Research Center has regularly organized lectures of Bhutanese culture. In the 12th lecture, the honorable guest speaker Sir (Dasho) Karma Ura (President, Centre for Bhutan Studies and GNH Research) will talk about Bhutan and GNH (Gross National Happiness).
[Date] 21 (Wed.) February 2018
[Time] 16:00-18:00 (Open 15:30)
[Place] Medium Seminar Room (3rd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center
(46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)
MAP http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/AboutUs/access.html
[Guest Speaker] Sir (Dasho) Karma Ura (President, Centre for Bhutan Studies and GNH Research)
[Title] “Bhutan and GNH (Gross National Happiness)”
[Convener] Dr. Seiji Kumagai (Uehiro Associate Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)
*Language: in English with Japanese translation
**Attendance: limited to 40 people
***Fee: free of charge
[Contact] Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, 46 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 Japan.
Tel: 075-753-9681 Mail: kokoro-bh[at]mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp

The 11th Bhutanese Culture Lecture International Workshop: Preservation and Restoration of Bhutanese Buddhist Art

The 11th Bhutanese Culture Lecture International Workshop:
Preservation and Restoration of Bhutanese Buddhist Art
bh_11.jpg
The “Bhutanese Culture Lecture” is held regularly as an outreach program at the Uehiro Research Division for Ethics and Spirituality of Bhutanese Studies at KRC.
The 11th Bhutanese Culture Lecture’s International Workshop will be co-organized by Kyoto University and the Bhutan Kingdom Friendship Program. Kesang Choden Tashi Highness (Thanka Preservation and Restoration Center/President) will give a keynote speech on “The Preservation and Restoration of Bhutanese Buddhist Art”
Lecturer: Kesang Choden Tashi Highness
Thanka Preservation and Restoration Center/President
The Bhutanese King, Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck is her cousin.
Lecture topic: The Preservation and Restoration of Bhutanese Buddhist Art
Panelist: Prof. Hiroshi Yoshioka (Kyoto University Kokoro Research Center, Program Specific Professor)
General moderator: Dr. Seiji Kumagai (Kyoto University’s Kokoro Research Center, Uehiro Ethics Research Division Chairperson, Program-Specific Associate Professor)
The lecture will be in Japanese with English interpretation provided.
-Date: Tuesday November 7 2017 16:30 – 18:00
-Location: Kyoto University Inamori Center, 3F Large Conference room
-Fee: Free of charge
-Email the following information to the Kokoro Research Center Liaison Office:
Your name, affiliation, email address/phone number.
In the subject line, please write “The 11th Bhutanese Culture Lecture Application”
(You will be contacted ONLY in case of maximum capacity)
E-mail:kokoro-bh*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp
(replace * with @)

Special Lecture Series on Asian Culture

Japanese Buddhism for Beginners:
Hasshu Koyo (Compendium of the Buddhist Teachings)

Full – not accepting applications as of 9/11/17
J_Buddhism.jpg
Japanese spirituality, morality, and ethics have evolved around and been influenced by Shintoism and Buddhism since antiquity. Unlike Shintoism, which originated in Japan, Buddhism underwent various transformations in its passage from India to Japan. What is current Japanese Buddhism like?
In this seminar, attendees will learn the basics of Japanese Buddhism of Nara, Heian and Kamakura eras using the Hasshu Koyo by monk, Gyonen (1240-1321) from Todaiji Temple in the Kamakura era as a textbook.
The first half of each seminar will focus on reading the Hasshu Koyo in both the classical kanbun style and the modern Japanese.
The second half of each meeting will focus on group discussions. Although this is a beginner level seminar, attendees with previous knowledge on the subject are welcome to attend.
Dates: Wednesdays in the Fall 2017 semester: 10/11, 10/18, 11/1, 11/8, 11/22, 11/29, 12/13, 12/20
Time: 18:00-19:30
Location: Kyoto University’s Inamori Foundation Center, 1st Floor Seminar Room
Fee: Free of Charge
Coordinators: Dr. Seiji Kumagai and Dr. Akinori Yasuda
Sponsored by the Kokoro Research Center, The Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education’s Bhutanese Studies Research Laboratory

18th Seminar on Bhutan/13th Seminar on Himayalan Religion (Conservation Project of Phajoding and Dungtse monasteries in Bhutan)

18th Seminar on Bhutan/13th Seminar on Himayalan Religion (Conservation Project of Phajoding and Dungtse monasteries in Bhutan)
The department of Bhutanese Studies, Uehiro Research Division at Kokoro Research Center has regularly organized Seminars on Bhutanese Culture. In the 18th Seminar, the honorable guest speaker Mr. Epraim Jose will talk about his conservation project of Phajoding and Dungtse monasteries in Bhutan.
Date: Thurs. 13 April 2017
Time: 14:00-15:00
Place: Seminar Room No. 225 (2nd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center
(46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)
MAP: http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/AboutUs/access.html
Guest Speaker: Epraim Jose (Founder, Druk Foundation for Art Preservation)
Tentative title: Conservation Project of Phajoding and Dungtse monasteries in Bhutan.
*Language: in English with Japanese translation
**Attendance: limitted to 20 people
***Fee: free of charge
Contact: Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, 46 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 Japan.
Tel: 075-753-9681 Mail: kokoro-bh*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please replace * with @.)

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