• Top Page
  • About us
  • News
  • Staff
  • Collaborative Research Project
  • Links
  • Access
  • Mail form

Japanese page

Publication archive

Prof. Yoshikawa's new papers published in "Journal of Cognitive Psychology"

 Prof. Sakiko Yoshikawa's new papers published in "Journal of Cognitive Psychology" vol.28.


1612yoshikawa_journal.pngMasato Nunoi & Sakiko Yoshikawa (2016). Deep processing makes stimuli more prefereable over long duration. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 28, 756-763
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20445911.2016.1189917


●ABSTRACT


The purpose of the current study was twofold. First, we investigated whether the type of stimulus processing (e.g. levels of processing) influenced preferences for novel objects. Second, we examined whether the influence of levels of processing on preferences was long lasting (e.g. longer than a day/week). Results showed that levels of processing affected preferences whereby more deeply processed stimuli were preferred over those that were shallowly processed. This effect was more robust for stimuli that were presented multiple times. Additionally, this levels of processing effect lasted for up to 6 weeks, suggesting stability in preferences for information that was more deeply processed. We discuss these results in terms of theories predicting the role of stimulus properties and exposure on the development of preferences.


KEYWORDS: Preference, levels of processing, delay

Assistant Prof. Ueda's new paper published in "Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics"

Assistant Prof. Ueda's new paper published in "Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics" in Nov. 2016.



1608ueda.pngYoko Higuchi, Yoshiyuki Ueda, Hirokazu Ogawa, Jun Saiki. (2016). Task-relevant information is prioritized in spatiotemporal contextual cueing. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics.


○Abstract
Implicit learning of visual contexts facilitates search performance-a phenomenon known as contextual cueing; however, little is known about contextual cueing under situations in which multidimensional regularities exist simultaneously. In everyday vision, different information, such as object identity and location, appears simultaneously and interacts with each other. We tested the hypothesis that, in contextual cueing, when multiple regularities are present, the regularities that are most relevant to our behavioral goals would be prioritized. Previous studies of contextual cueing have commonly used the visual search paradigm. However, this paradigm is not suitable for directing participants' attention to a particular regularity. Therefore, we developed a new paradigm, the "spatiotemporal contextual cueing paradigm," and manipulated task-relevant and task-irrelevant regularities. In four experiments, we demonstrated that task-relevant regularities were more responsible for search facilitation than task-irrelevant regularities. This finding suggests our visual behavior is focused on regularities that are relevant to our current goal.


DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13414-016-1198-0

Abe and Nakai's new paper published in "Neuroimage"

Associate Prof. Nobuhito Abe and Research fellow Ryusuke Nakai's new paper published in "Neuroimage" Vol.133 June 2016.


1607abe_nakai.pngKajimura S, Kochiyama T, Nakai R, Abe N, Nomura M (2016)
Causal relationship between effective connectivity within the default mode network and mind-wandering regulation and facilitation
Neuroimage 133: 21-30
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053811916002056


○Abstract
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can modulate mind wandering, which is a shift in the contents of thought away from an ongoing task and/or from events in the external environment to self-generated thoughts and feelings. Although modulation of the mind-wandering propensity is thought to be associated with neural alterations of the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) and regions in the default mode network (DMN), the precise neural mechanisms remain unknown. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the causal relationships among tDCS (one electrode placed over the right IPL, which is a core region of the DMN, and another placed over the left LPFC), stimulation-induced directed connection alterations within the DMN, and modulation of the mind-wandering propensity. At the behavioral level, anodal tDCS on the right IPL (with cathodal tDCS on the left LPFC) reduced mind wandering compared to the reversed stimulation. At the neural level, the anodal tDCS on the right IPL decreased the afferent connections of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) from the right IPL and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Furthermore, mediation analysis revealed that the changes in the connections from the right IPL and mPFC correlated with the facilitation and inhibition of mind wandering, respectively. These effects are the result of the heterogeneous function of effective connectivity: the connection from the right IPL to the PCC inhibits mind wandering, whereas the connection from the mPFC to the PCC facilitates mind wandering. The present study is the first to demonstrate the neural mechanisms underlying tDCS modulation of mind-wandering propensity.

Associate Prof. Abe's new paper published in "Neuroscience"

 Associate Prof. Nobuhito Abe's new papers published in "Neuroscience" Vol.328.


Ito A, Fujii T, Abe N, Kawasaki I, Hayashi A, Ueno A, Yoshida K, Sakai S, Mugikura S, Takahashi S, Mori E (2016)
Gender differences in ventromedial prefrontal cortex activity associated with valuation of faces
Neuroscience 328: 194-200

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306452216301324 ※認証有り


○Abstract

Psychological studies have indicated that males exhibit stronger preferences for physical attributes in the opposite gender, such as facial attractiveness, than females. However, whether gender differences in mate preference originate from differential brain activity remains unclear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the patterns of brain activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), a region critical for the valuation of faces, in response to elderly male, elderly female, young male, and young female faces. During fMRI, male and female subjects were presented with a face and asked to rate its pleasantness. Following fMRI, the subjects were presented with pairs of faces and asked to select the face that they preferred. We analyzed the vmPFC activity during the pleasantness-rating task according to the gender of the face stimulus (male and female) and the age of the face stimulus (elderly and young). Consistent with the results of previous studies, the vmPFC activity parametrically coded the subjective value of faces. Importantly, the vmPFC activity was sensitive to physical attributes, such as the youthfulness and gender of the faces, only in the male subjects. These findings provide a possible neural explanation for gender differences in mate preference.

Yanagisawa & Abe's new paper published in "Journal of Experimental Psychology: General"

 Assistant Professor Kuniaki Yanagisawa and Associate Prof. Nobuhito Abe's new paper published in "Journal of Experimental Psychology: General".


Yanagisawa K, Abe N, Kashima ES, Nomura M (2016)
Self-esteem modulates amygdala-VLPFC connectivity in response to mortality threats
Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (3): 273-283
http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/xge/145/3/273/


○Abstract
Reminders of death often elicit defensive responses in individuals, especially among those with low self-esteem. Although empirical evidence indicates that self-esteem serves as a buffer against mortality threats, the precise neural mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test the hypothesis that self-esteem modulates neural responses to death-related stimuli, especially functional connectivity within the limbic-frontal circuitry, thereby affecting subsequent defensive reactions. As predicted, individuals with high self-esteem subjected to a mortality threat exhibited increased amygdala-ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) connectivity during the processing of death-related stimuli compared with individuals who have low self-esteem. Further analysis revealed that stronger functional connectivity between the amygdala and the VLPFC predicted a subsequent decline in responding defensively to those who threaten one's beliefs. These results suggest that the amygdala-VLPFC interaction, which is modulated by self-esteem, can reduce the defensiveness caused by death-related stimuli, thereby providing a neural explanation for why individuals with high self-esteem exhibit less defensive reactions to mortality threats. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

Nakai & Abe's new paper published in "Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging"

 Research fellow Ryusuke Nakai and Associate Prof. Nobuhito Abe's new paper published in "Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging".


Kajimura S, Kochiyama T, Nakai R, Abe N, Nomura M (2015)
Fear of negative evaluation is associated with altered brain function in nonclinical subjects
Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging 234 (3): 362-368
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925492715301177


○Abstract
Social anxiety disorder (SAD), which involves excessive anxiety and fear of negative evaluation, is accompanied by abnormalities in brain function. While social anxiety appears to be represented on a spectrum ranging from nonclinical behavior to clinical manifestation, neural alteration in nonclinical populations remains unclear. This study examined the relationship between psychological measures of social anxiety, mainly using the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (FNES), and brain function (functional connectivity, degree centrality, and regional betweenness centrality). Results showed that FNES scores and functional connectivity of the parahippocampal gyrus and orbitofrontal cortex and the betweenness centrality of the right parietal cortex were negatively correlated. These regions are altered in SAD patients, and each is associated with social cognition and emotional processing. The results supported the perspective that social anxiety occurs on a spectrum and indicated that the FNES is a useful means of detecting neural alterations that may relate to the social anxiety spectrum. In addition, the findings indicated that graph analysis was useful in investigating the neural underpinnings of SAD in addition to other psychiatric symptoms.

Associate Prof. Abe's new paper published in "Experimental Brain Research"

 Associate Prof. Nobuhito Abe's new papers published in "Experimental Brain Research".


Mugikura S, Abe N, Ito A, Kawasaki I, Ueno A, Takahashi S, Fujii T (2016)
Medial temporal lobe activity associated with the successful retrieval of destination memory
Experimental Brain Research 234: 95-104
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00221-015-4415-5


○Abstract
Destination memory is the process of remembering to whom we tell particular things. Although recent behavioral studies have clarified the cognitive nature of destination memory, the neural mechanisms underlying destination memory retrieval remain unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to determine whether the medial temporal lobe (MTL), a structure that has been implicated in recollection-based memory, is activated during the successful retrieval of destination information. During a study phase before fMRI scanning, the subjects told a series of facts to either a woman or a man. During fMRI scanning, the subjects were asked to judge whether each fact presented was old or new, and if they judged it as old, to indicate, including a confidence rating (high or low), whether the subjects had told that fact to either a man or a woman. We found that successful destination retrieval, when compared to failed destination retrieval, was associated with increased activity in the parahippocampal gyrus. We also found that the confidence level (high vs. low) for destination memory retrieval was associated with increased activity in another (posterior) region of the parahippocampal gyrus. The present study suggests that the successful retrieval of destination information depends highly on MTL-mediated recollection processes.

Associate Prof. Uchida's new papers published in "Japanese Psychological Research"

 Associate Prof. Yukiko Uchida's new papers published in "Japanese Psychological Research".


Boiger, M., Uchida, Y., Norasakkunkit, V., & Mesquita, B. (2016). Protecting autonomy, protecting relatedness: Appraisal patterns of daily anger and shame in the United States and Japan.
Japanese Psychological Research, 58, 28-41.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jpr.12096/abstract


○Abstract
The present study tested the idea that U.S. and Japanese participants appraise anger and shame situations in line with the American concern for autonomy and the Japanese concern for relatedness, respectively. Sixty-five U.S. and 72 Japanese students participated in a 7-day diary study of anger and shame. Each day, participants reported their most important anger and shame incident and indicated whether they themselves or others were to be blamed (anger appraisals), and whether they focused on themselves or the opinion of others (shame appraisals). They also indicated whether they had experienced anger toward someone close or distant and whether their shame was publicly seen or privately felt. In line with the Japanese concern for protecting relatedness, Japanese compared to U.S. participants blamed themselves relatively more than others during anger situations with close others and focused on others rather than themselves during shame episodes that were publicly seen. Underlining the U.S. concern for protecting autonomy, Americans blamed others more than themselves during anger situations and focused more on themselves than others during shame situations.


Uchida, Y., & Oishi, S. (2016). The happiness of individuals and the collective. Japanese Psychological Research, 58, 125-141.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jpr.12103/abstract ※認証有り


○Abstract
Happiness and well-being are often defined as internal feelings or states of satisfaction. As such, research on well-being has focused on the long-term happiness and life satisfaction of individuals. But recently, psychological researchers have also begun to examine the effects that group-level functions (e.g., nation-level economic status) have on happiness. The present article: (a) overviews measures of individual and collective happiness and the validity of these measurements; (b) explicates the role of culture in understanding the long-term happiness and life satisfaction of individuals; and (c) explores the possibility and importance of studying the happiness of collectives (e.g., work groups, organizations, cities, nations). We then discuss future directions for happiness research, proposing several methodological and theoretical areas for progress in: (a) cross-temporal analyses to examine historical changes; and (b) multilevel analyses to identify the units of culture that affect happiness. Additionally, this paper argues that policy-making and interdisciplinary approaches can make important contributions to happiness studies.

New paper by Associate Prof. Uchida and Research Fellow, Ogihara published

 The paper "Are common names becoming less common? The rise in uniqueness and individualism in Japan" ( Frontiers in Psychology ) by Associate Prof. Yukiko Uchida and Research Fellow, Yuji Ogihara has published in Oct. 2015.


Yuji Ogihara, Hiroyo Fujita, Hitoshi Tominaga, Sho Ishigaki, Takuya Kashimoto, Ayano Takahashi, Kyoko Toyohara and Yukiko Uchida
"Are common names becoming less common? The rise in uniqueness and individualism in Japan"
Frontiers in Psychology, Volume 6 Article 1490 Published: 21 October 2015


http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01490/full
(Original Research Article / Open Access)

New paper by Prof. Funahashi and Research Fellow, Mochizuki published

 The paper "Prefrontal spatial working memory network predicts animal's decision-making in a free choice saccade task" ( Journal of Neurophysiology ) by Prof. Shintaro Funahashi and Research Fellow, Kei Mochizuki has published in Oct. 2015.


Kei Mochizuki, Shintaro Funahashi
"Prefrontal spatial working memory network predicts animal's decision-making in a free choice saccade task"
Journal of Neurophysiology, Published 21 October 2015


http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/jp/news2/2015/11/1511funahashi-journal-of-neurophysiology.php
(Japanese article)

New paper by Abe, Otsuka, Nakai and Yoshikawa published

 The paper "Brain activation during visual working memory correlates with behavioral mobility performance in older adults" ( Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience ) by Associate Prof. Nobuhito Abe, Research Fellow Yuki Otsuka, Research Fellow Ryusuke Nakai, Prof. Sakiko Yoshikawa has published in Sep, 2015.


Kawagoe T, Suzuki M, Nishiguchi S, Abe N, Otsuka Y, Nakai R, Yamada M, Yoshikawa S, Sekiyama K (2015)
Brain activation during visual working memory correlates with behavioral mobility performance in older adults
Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience 7: 186
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnagi.2015.00186/full

New paper by Kotaro Umemura (research fellow) published

 The paper "Knowing the Unknown and Leaving Neurosis: Psychotherapy Using Dream Analysis for a Woman Who Wanted to Accept What She Could not Accept" ( ARCHIVES OF SANDPLAY THERAPY ) by Kotaro Umemura, Research Fellow has published in 2015.


Umemura, K. (2015). Knowing the Unknown and Leaving Neurosis: Psychotherapy Using Dream Analysis for a Woman Who Wanted to Accept What She Could not Accept. ARCHIVES OF SANDPLAY THERAPY, 28(1), 69-78.
(邦題:知らないことを知ることと神経症からの出立――認めたくない自分を認めようと来談した女性との夢分析を用いた心理療法)


○Abstract:
The pathology of neurosis is regarded as a problem of "knowing." Therefore, it is important for neurotic clients to know truly the unknown they are supposed to know in order to leave their stalled world. From this viewpoint, this paper examines the psychotherapy using dream analysis for a woman who wanted to accept what she could not accept. Not knowing what she should know enabled her to remain an innocent child in the psychological sense, but also prevented her from maturing and becoming independent. However, paradoxically, her neurotic structure was collapsed by the very neurotic act itself, and she was forced to contact the unknown and to undergo a transformation. With this change, she gradually let go her obsession to remaining innocent and spotless, and accepted the femininity that she had rejected. Finally, she terminated the therapy by resigning herself to a life with defects.

New paper by Abe, Otsuka, Nakai and Yoshikawa published

 The paper "A 12-week physical and cognitive exercise program can improve cognitive function and neural efficiency in community-dwelling older adults: a randomized controlled trial" ( Journal of the American Geriatrics Society ) by Prof. Sakiko Yoshikawa, Associate Prof. Nobuhito Abe, Research Fellow Yuki Otsuka and Research Fellow Ryusuke Nakai has published in Jul, 2015.


Nishiguchi S, Yamada M, Tanigawa T, Sekiyama K, Kawagoe T, Suzuki M, Yoshikawa S, Abe N, Otsuka Y, Nakai R, Aoyama T, Tsuboyama T (2015). A 12-week physical and cognitive exercise program can improve cognitive function and neural efficiency in community-dwelling older adults: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 63 (7): 1355-1363


○Abstract
Objectives To investigate whether a 12-week physical and cognitive exercise program can improve cognitive function and brain activation efficiency in community-dwelling older adults.


Design Randomized controlled trial.
Setting Kyoto, Japan.
Participants Community-dwelling older adults (N = 48) were randomized into an exercise group (n = 24) and a control group (n = 24).


Intervention Exercise group participants received a weekly dual task-based multimodal exercise class in combination with pedometer-based daily walking exercise during the 12-week intervention phase. Control group participants did not receive any intervention and were instructed to spend their time as usual during the intervention phase.
Measurements The outcome measures were global cognitive function, memory function, executive function, and brain activation (measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging) associated with visual short-term memory.
Results Exercise group participants had significantly greater postintervention improvement in memory and executive functions than the control group (P < .05). In addition, after the intervention, less activation was found in several brain regions associated with visual short-term memory, including the prefrontal cortex, in the exercise group (P < .001, uncorrected).
Conclusion A 12-week physical and cognitive exercise program can improve the efficiency of brain activation during cognitive tasks in older adults, which is associated with improvements in memory and executive function.

2 books by Prof. Becker published

Prof. Carl Becker's new books (written in Japanese) published in spring 2015.


1505becker_aisurumono.png1505becker_meisou.png


More information (Japanese article)

Associate Prof. Uchida's new paper published in "PLoS ONE"

Associate Prof. Yukiko Uchida's paper "How did the media report on the Great East Japan Earthquake? Objectivity and emotionality seeking in Japanese media coverage." has been published in "PLoS ONE" on 18, May 2015.


1506plos one.png
Uchida, Y., Kanagawa, C., Takenishi, A., Harada, A., Okawa, K., & Yabuno, H. (2015).
How did the media report on the Great East Japan Earthquake? Objectivity and emotionality seeking in Japanese media coverage. PLoS ONE, e0125966.
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0125966

"Psychologia, Vol. 57, No.4 (2014)" Published

"Psychologia, Vol. 57, No.4 (2014)" has been published in December, 2014.


1506psychologia.png Psychology basically focuses on psychological and behavioral mechanisms at an individual level, but it also needs to explore macro level and collective phenomena. Especially in social psychology and cultural psychology, researchers have investigated group process, organizational behavior, and the mechanisms of cultural/instuitutional effects on psychological functions. Among them, studies on regions and local communities have become more important than before. For example, after the severe damage from the Great East Japan earthquake, people in Japan found out the power of social networks in regional communities. However, we have not fully elucidated what constitutes the important component of "region," which is a rather obscure concept. Sometimes we can say it is a platform of community. We can also define it as geographical neighborhood that shares certain ecological contexts. To provide the current insight of regional studies more clearly, this special issue of Psychologia includes a collection of papers that conduct regional studies from a multidisciplinary approach, including psychology, anthropology, and action research.

("EDITORIAL: REGIONAL COMMUNITIES" by Yukiko UCHIDA and Kosuke TAKEMURA)


CONTENTS: Vol. 57, No.4 (2014) | Psychologia Website

Associate Prof. Uchida's new paper published in German academic book "Forschung fordern"

Associate Prof. Yukiko Uchida and researcher Shintaro Fukushima's paper "Interdependently Achieved Happiness in East Asian Cultural Context. A Cultural Psychological Point of View" has been published in German academic book "Forschung fördern: Am Beispiel von Lebensqualität im Kulturkontext".


Uchida, Y., Ogihara, Y., & Fukushima, S. (in press). Interdependently Achieved Happiness in East Asian Cultural Context. A Cultural Psychological Point of View.
In G. Trommsdorff, & W. R. Assmann (Hrsg.), Forschung fördern. Am Beispiel von Lebensqualität im Kulturkontext . UVK Verlag., Germany.
http://www.uvk.de/buecher/alle/db/titel/details/forschung-foerdern-1/

○Abstract
Recent cultural psychological studies have suggested that there is considerable variation in how people feel and conceptualize happiness and wellbeing. Particularly in Japan, compared with European American cultural contexts where wellbeing is achieved through personal attainment or self-esteem, wellbeing is construed as balance and harmony and it is achieved collectively and interdependently. We will further discuss the cultural construal of wellbeing during globalization.

The book "Bhutanese Buddhism and Its Culture" by Associate Prof. Kumagai published

1412kumagai_book.jpgWe are pleased to inform you that Dr. Seiji KUMAGAI (Associate Professor, Uehiro Kokoro Studies, Kokoro Research Center) published the book "Bhutanese Buddhism and Its Culture" from Vajra Publications (Kathmandu).


Please check Amazon.com:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/9937623235/


Vajra Book Shop:
http://www.vajrabookshop.com/more_info.php?category_cd=39&product_cd=1838


○Bibliography
[Title] Bhutanese Buddhism and Its Culture
[Author] Seiji Kumagai
[Publisher] Vajra Books (December 1, 2014)
[Page number] 250 pages
[Language] English
[ISBN-10] 9937623235
[ISBN-13] 978-9937623230


○About the Book
With much of its old socio-cultural identity still intact, Bhutan attracts interest from many oriental scholars. Bhutan is also seeing a phenomenal growth in interest from many multi-disciplinary researchers who are adapting different political and economic frameworks in trying to understand the unique approach to development in this country that is best expressed in its national development philosophy of Gross National Happiness. This concept was first propounded by the Fourth King, His Majesty Jigme Singye Wangchuck who believed spiritual development and environmental conservation must go hand in hand with material advancement in the country's journey to wellbeing and prosperity. Bhutanese Buddhism and Its Culture is a comprehensive introduction to the country's diverse Buddhist traditions, as well as its unique statecraft, monasticism and people's general way of life, all of which form the culture of the country. The publication of this book is a part of the initiative of the Bhutanese Buddhism Research Project (BBRP) based in Kyoto University to promote the academic study of Bhutan and enhance cooperation between scholars of different specializations and regions. Leading researchers on Bhutan have come together to work on this book which carries scholarly text and field based reports and papers on two major Buddhist schools in Bhutan, its pre-Buddhist religion Bon, and the popular culture of the people. It is hoped that the timely publication of this book will promote a greater understanding of the spirituality of the Bhutanese people today by analyzing historical precedents, and their concern towards the wellbeing and happiness of all beings.


○Table of Contents
-Foreword by Damcho DORJI (Minister, Ministery of Home & Cultural Affairs)
-Introduction by Seiji KUMAGAI

[Chapter 1. Nyingma School]
- Karma URA "Longchen's Forests of Poetry and Rivers of Composition in Bhutan: "The illuminating map - titled as forest park of flower garden - of Bumthang, the divine hidden land" composed in 1355 by Longchen Ramjam (1308-1363)"
- Akinori YASUDA "A Study of Rgyud bu chung Discovered by Pema Lingpa"

[Chapter 2. Drukpa Kagyu School]
- Gembo DORJI "The Lho-Druk Tradition of Bhutan: The Arrival and Spread of Buddhism"
- Karma URA "Monastic System of the Drukpa Kagyu ('Brug pa bka' brgyud) School in Bhutan"
- Thupten Gawa MATSUSHITA "Introduction to the Theory of Mahāmudrā by the Founder of Drukpa Kagyü, Tsangpa Gyaré Yeshe Dorje (1161-1211)"

[Chapter 3. Other Schools]
- Françoise POMMARET "Bon in Bhutan. What is in the name?"
- Seiji KUMAGAI "History and Current Situation of the Sa skya pa School in Bhutan"

[Chapter 4. Buddhist Culture]
- Lungtaen GYATSO "A Note on the Concept of Happiness and Prosperity"
- Akiko UEDA "Understanding the Practice of Dual Residence in the Context of Transhumance: A Case from Western Bhutan"
- Elizabeth MONSON "Alternative Voices: The Unusual Case of Drukpa Kunley ('Brug pa kun legs)"
- Riam KUYAKANON KNAPP "Contemplations on a Bhutanese Buddhist Environmental Narrative"
- Dendup CHOPHEL and Dorji KHANDU "Byis pa'i dpa' bo: The Dance of Youthful Heroes"

New paper by Yuki Otsuka (research fellow) published

The paper " High-performers use the phonological loop less to process mental arithmetic during working memory tasks " ( The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology ) by Yuki Otsuka, Research Fellow has published in Nov, 2014.


Otsuka, Y., and Osaka, N. (in press). High-performers use the phonological loop less to process mental arithmetic during working memory tasks, The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17470218.2014.966728#abstract


○Abstract
This study investigated the effects of three working memory components--the central executive, phonological loop, and visuospatial sketchpad--on performance differences in complex mental arithmetic between individuals. Using the dual-task method, we examined how performance during two-digit addition was affected by load on the central executive (random tapping condition), phonological loop (articulatory suppression condition), and visuospatial sketchpad (spatial tapping condition) compared to that under no load (control condition) in high- and low-performers of complex mental arithmetic in Experiment 1. Low-performers showed an increase in errors under the random tapping and articulatory suppression conditions, whereas high-performers showed an increase of errors only under the random tapping condition. In Experiment 2, we conducted similar experiments on only the high-performers but used a shorter presentation time of each number. We found the same pattern for performing complex mental arithmetic as seen in Experiment 1. These results indicate that high-performers might reduce their dependence on the phonological loop, because the central executive enables them to choose a strategy in which they use less working memory capacity.

Prof. Yoshikawa's article on "Jido Shinri"

 Prof. Sakiko Yoshikawa's commentary article has published in the magazine "Jido Shinri (child psychology)" Dec.2014 issue.


1411yoshikawa_jidoshinri.png


Read More ( Japanese article )

Associate Prof. Uchida's new paper published in "PLoS ONE"

Associate Prof. Yukiko Uchida's new paper "Social orientation and diabetes-related distress in Japanese and American patients with type 2 diabetes" has been published in "PLoS ONE".


"Social orientation and diabetes-related distress in Japanese and American patients with type 2 diabetes," Kaori Ikeda, Shimpei Fujimoto, Beth Morling, Shiho Ayano-Takahara, Andrew E Carroll, Shin-ichi Harashima, Yukiko Uchida, and Nobuya Inagaki, PLOS ONE, online October 15, 2014,
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0109323

The book "Spiritual Care" by Prof. Kamata and Prof. Becker published

New book "Spiritual Care" edited by Prof. Toji Kamata (written in Japanese) published by Being-Net-Press on Sep. 2014. Also Prof. Carl Becker is one of the co-authors of this book.


1409kamata_spiritualcare.png


More information (Japanese article)

Prof. Kawai and Ogiso ( JSPS Research Fellow/PD)'s new paper published in "Analytical Psychology in a Changing World"

Prof. Toshio Kawai and Yuka Ogiso ( JSPS Research Fellow/PD)'s each new paper has been published in "Analytical Psychology in a Changing World".


1408kawai_analytical_psychology.pngDescription:

How can we make sense of ourselves within a world of change?

In Analytical Psychology in a Changing World, an international range of contributors examine some of the common pitfalls, challenges and rewards that we encounter in our efforts to carve out identities of a personal or collective nature, and question the extent to which analytical psychology as a school of thought and therapeutic approach must also adapt to meet our changing needs.


The contributors assess contemporary concerns about our sense of who we are and where we are going, some in light of recent social and natural disasters and changes to our social climates, others by revisiting existential concerns and philosophical responses to our human situation in order to assess their validity for today. ーー


Analytical Psychology in a Changing World will be essential reading for Jungian and post-Jungian scholars and clinicians of depth psychology, as well as sociologists, philosophers and any reader with a critical interest in the important cultural ideas of our time.


http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415721288/


VIEW INSIDE THIS BOOK


2. Big Stories and Small Stories in the Psychological Relief Work after the Earthquake Disaster: Life and Death ーーToshio Kawai


11. The Red Book and Psychological Types: A qualitative change of Jung's typology ーーYuka Ogiso

New paper of Associate Prof. Abe published in "Journal of Neuroscience"

The paper " Response to anticipated reward in the nucleus accumbens predicts behavior in an independent test of honesty " ( Journal of Neuroscience ) by Associate Prof. Nobuhito Abe has published in 6th Aug, 2014.


Abe, N., Greene, J.D. (2014) Response to anticipated reward in the nucleus accumbens predicts behavior in an independent test of honesty. Journal of Neuroscience. 34(32), 10564-10572.


Abstract
This study examines the cognitive and neural determinants of honesty and dishonesty. Human subjects undergoing fMRI completed a monetary incentive delay task eliciting responses to anticipated reward in the nucleus accumbens. Subjects next performed an incentivized prediction task, giving them real and repeated opportunities for dishonest gain. Subjects attempted to predict the outcomes of random computerized coin-flips and were financially rewarded for accuracy. In some trials, subjects were rewarded based on self-reported accuracy, allowing them to gain money dishonestly by lying. Dishonest behavior was indexed by improbably high levels of self-reported accuracy. Nucleus accumbens response in the first task, involving only honest rewards, accounted for ∼25% of the variance in dishonest behavior in the prediction task. Individuals showing relatively strong nucleus accumbens responses to anticipated reward also exhibited increased dorsolateral prefrontal activity (bilateral) in response to opportunities for dishonest gain. These results address two hypotheses concerning (dis)honesty. According to the "Will" hypothesis, honesty results from the active deployment of self-control. According to the "Grace" hypothesis, honesty flows more automatically. The present results suggest a reconciliation between these two hypotheses while explaining (dis)honesty in terms of more basic neural mechanisms: relatively weak responses to anticipated rewards make people morally "Graceful," but individuals who respond more strongly may resist temptation by force of Will.


Read overview ( Japanese article )

New paper by Yuki Otsuka (research fellow) published

The paper " Working memory of elderly adults " ( Japanese Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry ) by Yuki Otsuka, Research Fellow has published in May, 2014.


Yuki Otsuka(2014), Working memory of elderly adults. Japanese Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 5, 498-503

Prof. Yoshikawa and Associate Prof. Uchida's new paper published in "PLoS ONE"

Prof. Sakiko Yoshikawa and Associate Prof. Yukiko Uchida's new paper ( the first author: Kosuke Takemura ) "Roles of Extension Officers to Promote Social Capital in Japanese Agricultural Communities" has been published in "PLoS ONE".


Takemura, K., Uchida, Y., & Yoshikawa S (2014). Roles of extension officers to promote social capital in Japanese agricultural communities. PLoS ONE 9:
e91975. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0091975
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0091975


Read more ( Japanese article )


1405uchida_journal.png

Prof.Kawai's new book "Tono Monogatari" published

Prof. Toshio Kawai 's new book "Tono Monogatari" co-authored with Norio Akasaka, Migiwa Imaishi, Yasuhiro Tanaka, Takashi Okabe, Satoko Kawano, Tsuyoshi Inomata, Keiko Iwamiya and Hiroyuki Miura published in March 2014 by Iwanami.


Read more ( Japanese article )


The book featured in "Yomiuri Online" on Apr. 28. See article ( Japanese )


1404kawai_tohnomonogatari.png

Prof. Kamata's new book published.

Prof. Toji Kamata's new book "The Ultimate Guide To Sacred Sites In Japan" was published by Kadokawa Corporation.


140418kamata.png


Amazon co.jp

Prof. Kawai, Assistant Prof. Hatanaka and Researcher Hasegawa's new paper published in "Archives of sandplay therapy"

Prof. Toshio Kawai, Assistant Prof. Chihiro Hatanaka and Researcher Chihiro Hasegawa's new paper has been published in "Archives of sandplay therapy"26(3), 3-14. The paper is written about 9 cases of play therapy at the playroom of the Kokoro Research Center. It reported what changes are to be seen before and after the therapy for six months considered.


Read more ( Japanese article )


▽Website of The Japan Association of Sandplay Therapy
http://www.sandplay.jp/index_e.html

Prof. Kawai's new paper published in "Archives of sandplay therapy"

Prof. Toshio Kawai's new paper has been published in "Archives of sandplay therapy" (special edition). The paper is written about mind care activities after the earthquake in Tohoku.


▽Website of The Japan Association of Sandplay Therapy
http://www.sandplay.jp/index_e.html

New paper of Associate Prof. Nobuhito Abe and Ayahito Ito (JSPS Research Fellow/PD) published in "Brain Research"

140326abe.pngThe paper "Dissociable neural systems for moral judgment of anti- and pro-social lying" authored by Associate Prof. Nobuhito Abe and Ayahito Ito (JSPS Research Fellow/PD) has been published in "Brain Research" in Mar 2014.


Hayashi A, Abe N, Fujii T, Ito A, Ueno A, Koseki Y, Mugikura S, Takahashi S, Mori E (2014)
Dissociable neural systems for moral judgment of anti- and pro-social lying
Brain Research 1556: 46-56


○Abstract
Pro-social lying, which serves to benefit listeners, is considered more socially and morally acceptable than anti-social lying, which serves to harm listeners. However, it is still unclear whether the neural mechanisms underlying the moral judgment of pro-social lying differ from those underlying the moral judgment of anti-social lying. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural activities associated with moral judgment in anti- and pro-social lying. During fMRI scanning, subjects were provided with scenarios describing a protagonist׳s anti- and pro-social lying and were then asked to judge whether the protagonist׳s act was morally appropriate. The behavioral data showed that anti-social lying was mostly judged to be morally inappropriate and that pro-social lying was mainly judged to be morally appropriate. The functional imaging data revealed dissociable neural systems for moral judgment in anti- and pro-social lying. The anti-social lying, which was judged to be morally inappropriate, was associated with increased activity in the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex, right middle frontal gyrus, right precuneus/posterior cingulate gyrus, left posterior cingulate gyrus, and bilateral temporoparietal junction when compared with the control condition. The pro-social lying, which was judged to be morally appropriate, was associated with increased activity in the right middle temporal gyrus, right supramarginal gyrus, and the left middle cingulate gyrus when compared with the control condition. No overlapping activity was observed during the moral judgment of anti- and pro-social lying. Our data suggest that cognitive and neural processes for the moral judgment of lying are modulated by whether the lie serves to harm or benefit listeners.


See More Information ( "Science Direct" website )

Associate Prof. Uchida's paper overview published in Kyoto University website

140325uchida_kyodaihp.pngAssociate Prof. Yukiko Uchida's paper (co-authored with Yuji Ogihara) overview with the author comments and related information ( written in Japanese ) was published in official website of Kyoto University.


Read overview ( Japanese article )

Associate Prof. Uchida's new paper published in "Frontiers in Psychology"

1403005uchida.pngAssociate Prof. Yukiko Uchida's new paper "Does individualism bring happiness? Negative effects of individualism on interpersonal relationships and happiness" co-authored with Yuji Ogihara has been published in "Frontiers in Psychology" in Mar 2014.


Ogihara, Y., & Uchida, Y. (2014). Does individualism bring happiness? Negative effects of individualism on interpersonal relationships and happiness. Frontiers in Psychology, 5: 135.


○Abstract
We examined the negative effects of individualism in an East Asian culture. Although individualistic systems decrease interpersonal relationships through competition, individualistic values have prevailed in European American cultures. One reason is because individuals could overcome negativity by actively constructing interpersonal relationships. In contrast, people in East Asian cultures do not have such strategies to overcome the negative impact of individualistic systems, leading to decreased well-being. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the relationship between individualistic values, number of close friends, and subjective well-being (SWB). Study 1 indicated that individualistic values were negatively related with the number of close friends and SWB for Japanese college students but not for American college students. Moreover, Study 2 showed that even in an individualistic workplace in Japan, individualistic values were negatively related with the number of close friends and SWB. We discuss how cultural change toward increasing individualism might affect interpersonal relationships and well-being.


Read More ( "Frontier" website )

Prof. Funahashi's paper overview published in Kyoto University website

140303funahashi_kyodaihp.pngProf. Shintaro Funahashi's paper overview with the author comments and related information ( written in Japanese ) was published in official website of Kyoto University.


Read overview ( Japanese article )

Prof. Funahashi's review paper published in "First Author's"

140318funahashi.pngProf. Shintaro Funahashi's review of his new paper "Neural mechanisms of dual-task interference and cognitive capacity limitation in the prefrontal cortex" co-authored with Ken Watanabe was published in Japanese website "First Author's" on 18th Mar, 2014.


Read review ( Japanese article )

Prof. Funahashi's paper published in "Nature Neuroscience"

140302Funahashi_nature.pngThe paper "Neural mechanisms of dual-task interference and cognitive capacity limitation in the prefrontal cortex" by Prof. Shintaro Funahashi and Kei Watanabe was published in "Nature Neuroscience" online in Mar 2014.


Kei Watanabe and Shintaro Funahashi (2014), Neural mechanisms of dual-task interference and cognitive capacity limitation in the prefrontal cortex, Nature Neuroscience, doi:10.1038/nn.3667


Read more ( Japanese article )

Prof. Kamata featured in "Mainichi Shinbun".

140313kamata_mainichi.pngProf. Toji Kamatawas featured in Japanese newspaper, "Mainichi Shinbun" on 13th Mar, 2014. He commented on the article which was written about deterioration in manners of the people in the places called "Power Spot".


For more introduction ( in Japanese )

Prof. Kawai featured in "Kyoto Shinbun"

140301kawai_kyoto.pngProf. Toshio Kawai was featured in Japanese newspaper, "Kyoto Shinbun" in 1st Mar, 2014. In the long interview "My keyword, Kyoto", Kawai named Kyoto "the city of soul" and explained the characteristics of the city of Kyoto from the perspective of psychologist.


Read more ( in Japanese )

Prof. Kawai's article published in "Shincho"

140311kawai_shincho.pngProf. Toshio Kawai's new essay "Dream as an interface in Haruki Murakami" was published in the March 2014 issue of "Monthly Shincho".


Read More ( Japanese Article )

Prof.Kamata's new book "Song and Religion" featured in "Tokushima Shinbun"

140218kamata_tokushima.pngProf. Toji Kamata's new book "Song and Religion" featured in Japanese local newspaper, "Tokushima Shinbun" in 18th Feb, 2014.

Read more ( in Japanese )

Prof. Kamata featured in "Taimatsu Tsushin"

140310kamata_taimatsu.pngProf. Toji Kamata was featured in journal "Taimatsu Tsushin" issued by Zenrinsha on 10th Mar, 2014. In the long interview, Kamata talked about the story of his new book "Song and Religion".


Read more ( in Japanese )

Prof. Kamata's column published in "Tokushima Shinbun"

140301kamata_tokushima.pngProf. Toji Kamata's column was published in local newspaper "Tokushima Shinbun" on 1st Mar, 2014. In the article, Prof. Kamata appreciate Mao Asada who played and attracted attention in figure skating Winter Olympics. He described the similarity of Asada and Miyamoto Musashi, hero in Japanese history.


Read more ( Japanese article )

Associate Prof. Uchida's new papers were published

140207uchida_jounalhappiness.png The paper "Changes in hedonic and eudaimonic well-being after a severe nationwide disaster: The case of the Great East Japan Earthquake" and "Interdependent Happiness: Theoretical Importance and Measurement Validity" by Yukiko Uchida, Associate Prof. has been published by Springer in Aug 2013 and Jan 2014.


Uchida, Y., Takahashi, Y., & Kawahara, K.
Changes in hedonic and eudaimonic well-being after a severe nationwide disaster: The case of the Great East Japan Earthquake. Journal of Happiness Studies, DOI 10.1007/s10902-013-9463-6
Abstract


Hitokoto, H., & Uchida, Y.
Interdependent Happiness: Theoretical Importance and Measurement Validity. Journal of Happiness Studies, DOI 10.1007/s10902-014-9505-8
Abstract

The paper " Psychological Characteristics of the NEW-FFI and the Tree Drawing Test in Patients With Thyroid Disease " by Chihiro Hasegawa, Research Fellow was published

IMG_6542.jpg The paper " Psychological Characteristics of the NEW-FFI and the Tree Drawing Test in Patients With Thyroid Disease " by Chihiro Hasegawa, Research Fellow (Uehiro Kokoro Studies) co-authored with Prof. Toshio Kawai et al in "Psychologia vol.56 No.2, June 2013".


C.Hasegawa, K.Umemura, M.Kaji, N.Nishigaki, T.Kawai, M.Tanaka, Y.Kanayama, H.Kuwabara, A.Fukao, & A.Miyauchi(2013) Psychological Characteristics of the NEW-FFI and the Tree Drawing Test in Patients With Thyroid Disease. Psychologia, 56(2), 138-153


『Psychologia』(Psychologia Society, Kyoto, Japan)Web site

Associate Prof. Uchida's new book "The Exploration of Happiness" published

130911uchida.png Associate Prof. Yukiko Uchida's new book, "The Exploration of Happiness: Present and Future Perspectives (Happiness Studies Book Series)", co-authored with Dr. Vinai Norasakkunkit (Minnesota State University) and Dr. Shinobu Kitayama (University of Michigan) has been published by Springer in Apr. 2013.


Uchida, Y., Norasakkunkit, V., & Kitayama, S. (2013).
Cultural constructions of happiness: Theory and empirical evidence.
In A. Delle Fave (Ed.), The exploration of happiness: Present and future perspectives. Springer.pp.269-280.


This specially selected collection of landmark work from the Journal of Happiness Studies maps the current contours, and the likely future direction, of research in a field with a fast-rising profile. This volume, which inaugurates a series aiming to explore discrete topics in happiness and wellbeing studies, features selected articles published in the Journal of Happiness Studies during its first decade, which culminated in an 'impact factor' in 2011. As the introductory work in the series, it provides readers with a vital overview of the prominent issues, problems and challenges that well-being and happiness research has had to overcome since its appearance on the scientific stage. The journal's very success evinces both the high scientific quality of the research covered, and the steadily growing interest in a subject that draws responses from a vast range of epistemological aiming points, taking in economics, sociology, psychology, philosophy, education and medicine.


(About this book)


"The Exploration of Happiness" : Amazon.com

"The Exploration of Happiness" : Springer

Associate Prof. Abe's two papers were published

 Associate Prof. Nobuhito Abe's two papers were published.


Abe N, Fujii T, Suzuki M, Ueno A, Shigemune Y, Mugikura S, Takahashi S, Mori E (2013)
Encoding- and retrieval-related brain activity underlying false recognition
Neuroscience Research 76 (4): 240-250


Ogura K, Fujii T, Abe N, Hosokai Y, Shinohara M, Fukuda H, Mori E (2013)
Regional cerebral blood flow and abnormal eating behavior in Prader-Willi syndrome
Brain and Development 35 (5): 427-434


 Those papers' abstracts and outlines are available online. Please see the links below.


Science Direct: "Neuroscience Research Volume 76, Issue 4"
Science Direct: "Brain and Development Volume 35 Issue 5"

The paper "Social Workers Can Use Sense of Coherence to Predict Burnout of End-of-Life Care-Givers (Research Report from Japan)" by Prof. Becker was published in British Journal of Social Work

130614becker.png 
Social Workers Can Use Sense of Coherence to Predict Burnout of End-of-Life Care-Givers (Research Report from Japan)
Kazuko Hiyoshi-Taniguchi, Carl B. Becker, and Ayae Kinoshita
British Journal of Social Work (2013) 1-15 doi:10.1093/bjsw/bct086, May 30, 2013


Abstract:
Social workers are deeply involved in supporting elder persons' home care-givers, who frequently border on burnout or nervous breakdown. Since social workers cannot fully assist every family caring for frail elders at home, it is valuable to pre-identify those care-givers in greatest need of social work support. Previous research suggests that care-givers' sleep interruption is a major factor in their sense of burden, but this alone proves inadequate to discriminate those in need of extra social work support. We hypothesised that care-givers' Sense of Coherence (SOC) was the major factor in their sense of burden. With co-operation of social workers in rural and urban Japan, we surveyed care-givers' SOC and sense of burden. Our study of 177 family care-givers showed that a high SOC substantially mitigated their sense of burden, while care-givers with low senses of meaning felt more burdened. This suggests that social workers should administer a simple SOC test to home care-givers in order to predict those care-givers most needful of social work assistance during End-of-Life (EOL) home care. Moreover, if social workers could elevate home care-givers' SOC through social support or programmes of exercise or meditation, this might reduce home care-givers' sense of burden, ultimately reducing burnout, neglect and abuse of homebound elderly.


The paper "From Dual Personalities to Reflected Adult Consciousness in the Psychotherapy of Dissociative Identity Disorder: The Dialectic Movement between Fake and Real" written by Assistant Prof. Chihiro Hatanaka was published.

Hatanaka,C(2013)From Dual Personalities to Reflected Adult Consciousness in the Psychotherapy of Dissociative Identity Disorder: The Dialectic Movement between Fake and Real Archives of sandplay therapy, 25:3 pp75-90 (The Japan Association of Sandplay Therapy)
Abstract: In contrast to conventional approaches in which it is important to treat the cause of the dissociative symptom, this case of dissociative identity disorder is distinctive in the paradoxical process. Although the child personality of the patient (alter personality) was thought to be a kind of fake, it has been kept in therapy. The process in which her child personality had been one-sidedly exaggerated and emphasized dialectically led the patient to internalize the dissociated personality and have a self-relationship in the end.

The paper "The 2011 earthquake in Japan: Psychotherapeutic interventions and change of worldview" written by Prof. Toshio Kawai was published.

130411spring_kawai2.png130411spring_kawai.pngToshio Kawai (2013) "The 2011 earthquake in Japan: Psychotherapeutic interventions and change of worldview", Spring 88: Environmental Disasters and Collective Trauma, pp47-60.
ISBN: 9781935528425
Abstract: In the face of earthquake disaster both material support and psychotherapeutic intervention are necessary for individual victims. Here I would like to address a third dimension: psychology of the earthquake from a global point of view. Although Japanese people are rather used to natural disasters, the 2011 earthquake brought about such unprecedented damage that it fundamentally shocked their existing worldview. In face of unexpected damages caused by the tsunami and the ongoing danger from the nuclear power plants, people no longer trust technology and the words of politicians and scientists. Unsatisfactory interventions and explanations after the disaster evoked more suspicion. In this sense, not only those in the stricken areas but the whole of the Japanese people were deeply touched by the disaster.
  Jung believed that peoples' worldview and global psychology can be studied and changed through individual psychotherapy. In his concept of the collective unconscious the collective dimension can be found in the individual psyche. If this is the case, our psychological relief work with the victims of the earthquake can shed light on the changes in the worldview.

The paper "Personal or interpersonal construal of happiness: A cultural psychological perspective. International Journal of Wellbeing" written by Associate Prof. Ukiko Uchida was published.

130228uchida_journal.pngUchida, Y., & Ogihara, Y. (2012). Personal or interpersonal construal of happiness: A cultural psychological perspective. International Journal of Wellbeing, 2(4), 354-369. doi:10.5502/ijw.v2.i4.5


Abstract: Cultural psychological research reveals considerable variation in how people construe happiness and experience subjective wellbeing. This paper identified substantial cultural differences in (1) meanings of happiness, (2) predictors of happiness, and (3) how social changes such as globalization are related to happiness. In European-American cultural contexts, happiness is construed as including experience of a highly desirable and positive emotional state defined in terms of a high arousal state such as excitement and a sense of personal achievement. Moreover, individual happiness is best predicted by personal goal attainment and high self-esteem or self-efficacy. In contrast, in East Asian cultural contexts (i.e., those found in Japan), happiness is construed as including experience of both positive and negative emotional state. Happiness is defined in terms of experiencing a low arousal state such as calmness and interpersonal connectedness and harmony. Furthermore, individual happiness is best predicted by relationship harmony and emotional support from others. While people maintain traditional cultural norms, some societies and organizations are under pressure from globalization and this might affect happiness. We examined how cultural change affects wellbeing, especially focusing on current Japanese contexts where individuals have experienced an increasing shift toward individualism and have experienced a large national disaster. Cultural psychological perspectives regarding happiness provide important contributions to psychological science and society at large.

The book "Buddhist Care for the Dying and Bereaved" was published. Two chapters were written by Prof. Carl Becker and Dr. Mari Sengoku.

130107becker_sengoku.pngBuddhist Care for the Dying and Bereaved
(Editors)Jonathan S. Watts, Yoshiharu Tomatsu
Wisdom Publications, Somerville, MA USA
Pages: 312
Publication Date: November 27, 2012


Book Description
Since its beginning, Buddhism has been intimately concerned with confronting and understanding death and dying. Indeed, the tradition emphasizes turning toward the realities of sickness, old age, and death--and using those very experiences to develop wisdom and liberating compassion. In recent decades, Buddhist chaplains and caregivers all over the world have been drawing on this tradition to contribute greatly to the development of modern palliative and hospice care in the secular world at large. Specifically Buddhist hospice programs have been further developing and applying traditional Buddhist practices of preparing for death, attending the dying, and comforting the bereaved.

Buddhist Care for the Dying and Bereaved contains comprehensive overviews of the best of such initiatives, drawn from diverse Buddhist traditions, and written by practitioners who embody the best of contemporary Buddhist hospice care programs practiced all over the world today.

Contributors include Carl B. Becker, Moichiro Hayashi, Yozo Taniyama, Mari Sengoku, Phaisan Visalo, Beth Kanji Goldring, Caroline Prasada Brazier, Joan Jiko Halifax, and Julie Chijo Hanada.

Amazon.com

The review "Neuroimaging studies of false memory: a selective review" written by Dr. Nobuhito Abe was published.

Nobuhito Abe (2012)
Neuroimaging studies of false memory: a selective review
Psychologia 55(2): 131-145

Abstract
-----------------------------------------------------------------
This article reviews neuroimaging studies that have attempted to distinguish between true and false memory retrieval. It also reviews neuroimaging studies that have measured neural activity during encoding and addresses the question of whether the encoding-related neural activity predicts subsequent memory distortions. Finally, there is a brief discussion from the cognitive neuroscience perspective about whether the memory distortion reflects deficient cognitive processing or is a by-product of adaptive cognitive processing.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

"Psychologia"
http://www.educ.kyoto-u.ac.jp/cogpsy/psychologia/

The paper "The Red Book from a pre-modern perspective: the position of the ego, sacrifice and the dead" written by Prof. Toshio Kawai was published.

2012-08-27.pngKawai, T. (2012), The Red Book from a pre-modern perspective: the position of the ego, sacrifice and the dead. Journal of Analytical Psychology, 57: 378-389. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-5922.2012.01976.x

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Keywords:
active imagination;the dead;ego;Japan;Jung;pre-modern;vision
Abstract: This paper tries to investigate The Red Book from a pre-modern point of view especially with reference to a Japanese cultural and clinical perspective. In spite of overwhelming contents from the unconscious, the position of the ego is remarkable as a formal aspect throughout The Red Book. The ego manifests itself as a stable observing agency which results in clear images. In the case of Japan, visions are historically rare because of the much more vague position of the ego. While in Liber Primus the ego manifests itself via suffering and tragedy, in Liber Secundus it has more distance and humour, and takes the form of comedy. Mythological images are internalized as fantasy in Liber Secundus. So the rebirth of God does not need to be performed literally but by way of internalization, which is the origin of Jungian psychology. In its substantial aspect, the references in The Red Book to pre-modern cultural images of sacrifice and redemption of the dead are impressive. The sacrifice may suggest that the numinous cannot be experienced as ritual and symbol but necessitates direct violence and sexuality.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

This paper is here.

The paper "An eye-like painting enhances the expectation of a good reputation" written by Dr. Kai Hiraishi was published.

Oda, R., Niwa, Y., Honma, A., & Hiraishi, K. (n.d.). An eye-like painting enhances the expectation of a good reputation. Evolution and Human Behavior, In Press, Corrected Proof. doi:10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2010.11.002