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Event archive

10th Lecuture of Bhutanese Culture (Light Waves That Built the Nation: Some Milestones in Bhutan's Education System)

10th Lecuture of Bhutanese Culture (Light Waves That Built the Nation: Some Milestones in Bhutan's Education System)

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The department of Bhutanese Studies at Kokoro research Center has regularly organized Lectures of Bhutanese Culture.In the 10th Lecture,the honorable guest speaker President Thakur S. Powdyel will talk about education in Bhutan.

[Date] 12 (Thurs.) January 2017
[Time] 17:00-19:30
[Place] Grand Seminar Room (3rd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center
      (46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)
MAP http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/AboutUs/access.html

[Guest Speaker] Prof. Thakur S. Powdyel (President, Royal Thimphu College; Former Minister of Education of the Kingdom of Bhutan)

[Title] "Light Waves That Built the Nation: Some Milestones in Bhutan's Education System"

[Convener] Dr. Seiji Kumagai (Uehiro Associate Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)


*Language: in English with Japanese translation
**Attendance: limitted to 100 people
***Fee: free of charge

[Contact] Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, 46 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 Japan.
Tel: 075-753-9681 Mail: kokoro-bh*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp

11th Seminar of Himalayan Religion International Workshop

Traditional Wisdom & Body-Mind Practices in the Himalayas and Their Potential Applications to Modern Society


eng_v3_11th Seminar of Himalayan Religion.jpg


For centuries, Himalayan meditation practitioners have directly experienced the beneficial effects of meditation practice in preventing and healing many forms of illness. In the last few decades, there has been a growing interest in mind-body practices, and their therapeutic use. Tibetan spiritual traditions utilize mind-body practices as a way to heal one's body, energy and mind. During this workshop, we will discuss how we could apply Himalayan traditional wisdom and body-mind practices to modern society.
[1st Day] Dr. Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche has explored the possible benefits of Tibetan yogic practices from the Bon tradition in people with cancer and their caregivers in collaboration with medical scientists. On the first day, he will talk about "Breathe as Medicine: Yogic Practices of the Bon Tradition and Their Effects on Human Health" to share his knowledge of these ancient practices, as well as how to apply them in our modern daily life.
[2nd Day] Centuries ago, Tibetan yogis developed spiritual practices that use dream and sleep as a spiritual path. The practice of dream yoga is meant to deepen our awareness during all our experience: the dreams of the night; the dream-like experience of the day; and the bardo experiences of death. The ultimate goal of Tibetan dream yoga is the recognition of the nature of mind or enlightenment itself. Dr. Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche will discuss the relationships between dream and waking, and dream and death.


[Date] 26 (Mon.) and 27 (Tues.) September 2016
[Time] 16:30-19:00
[Place] Medium Seminar Room (3rd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center
    (46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)
    MAP http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/AboutUs/access.html
[Guest Speaker] Dr. (Geshe) Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche (Founder, Ligmincha International)
[Title 1] "Breathe as Medicine: Yogic Practices of the Bon Tradition and Their Effects on Human Health" (26th Sept.)
[Title 2] "Dream Yoga in the Bon Tradition" (27th Sept.)
[Discussants] Dr. Marc-Henri Deroche (Associate Professor, Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability, Kyoto University)
       Dr. Yoshiyuki Ueda (Assistant Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)
       Dr. Kengo Konishi (Senior Lecturer, Kanazawa Seiryo University)
[Convener] Dr. Seiji Kumagai (Uehiro Associate Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)


*Language: in English with Japanese translation
**Attendance: limitted to 50 people
***Fee: free of charge


[Contact] Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, 46 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 Japan.
     Tel: 075-753-9681
     Mail: kokoro-event-2*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please replace * with @.)          



[Time Schedule]
26th (Mon.) Sept.
16:30-16:35 Opening Remarks by Dr. Seiji Kumagai (Uehiro Associate Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)
16:35-18:15 "Breathe as Medicine: Yogic Practices of the Bon Tradition and Their Effects on Human Health" by Dr. (Geshe) Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche (Director, Ligmincha International) *50 minutes for presentation/ 50 minutes for interpretation into Japanese.
18:15-18:25 Break
18:25-18:40 Discussion with Researchers:
       Dr. Marc-Henri Deroche (Associate Professor, Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability, Kyoto University)
       Dr. Yoshiyuki Ueda (Assistant Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)
18:40-18:55 Discussion with Audience
18:55-19:00 Closing Remarks


27th (Tues.) Sept.
16:30-16:35 Opening Remarks
16:35-18:15 "Dream Yoga in the Bon Tradition" by Dr. (Geshe) Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche (*50 minutes for presentation/ 50 minutes for interpretation into Japanese)
18:15-18:25 Break
18:25-18:40 Discussion with Researchers:
       Dr. Kengo Konishi (Senior Lecturer, Kanazawa Seiryo University)
18:40-18:55 Discussion with Audience
18:55-19:00 Closing Remarks


[Guest Speaker]
Dr. (Geshe) Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche
Founder and spiritual director of Ligmincha International, is an acclaimed author as well as a highly respected and beloved teacher to students throughout the United States, Mexico, South America, Europe and Asia.
Since his young age, he had studied philosophy, logic, vajrayana, meditation, etc., and finally got a title of Geshe (Ph.D in monastic universities in Tibet and its sorrounding regions) in Menri Monastery in India. Thereafter he has instructed both philosophy and meditation in Europe and USA. His has tried to make the ancient Tibetan teachings highly accessible and relevant to in our daily lives. Especially in the USA, he has conducted scientific research on the effect of Yoga on human body in collaboration with medical scientists.
He is the author of Awakening the Sacred Body; Tibetan Sound Healing; Awakening the Luminous Mind; The True Source of Healing; The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep; Healing with Form, Energy and Light; Wonders of the Natural Mind; Tibetan Yogas of Body, Speech and Mind; and Unbounded Wholeness (with Anne Klein). For more information about Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche's activities, please visit www.ligmincha.org.

International Workshop of Area Studies on Himalaya and Bhutan

International Workshop of Area Studies on Himalaya and Bhutan / Thurs 4 Aug. 2016


[Date] Thurs. 4 August 2016

[Time] 13:00-16:30

[Place] Medium Seminar Room (3rd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center
    (46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)
    http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/AboutUs/access.html


[Co-sponsors] JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research A (The practice-oriented area study challenging to rural global), Kyoto University Research Coordination, 18th Seminar on Bhutan.


[Time Table]
13:00-13:05 Opening Remarks by Dr. Seiji Kumagai (Uehiro Associate Professor, KRC, Kyoto University)
13:05-13:10 Introduction by Dr. Kazuo Ando (Associate Professor, CSEAS, Kyoto University) *Introduction of Prof. Ando's research project.
13:10-13:50 "Household Air Pollution and Potantial Health Implication in Rural Bhutan" by Dr. Tenzin Wangchuk (Dean,Academic Affairs, Sherubtse College)
13:50-14:30 "The Living Tales of Ama Jomo, In Merak Village, Trashigang District, Bhutan" by Mr. Sumjay Tshering (Lecturer, Sherubtse College, RUB)
14:30-14:40 Break
14:40-15:20 "Water pollution in Kanglung Area, Trashigang District, Bhutan" by Ms. Pema Choden (Lecturer, Sherubtse College, RUB)
15:20-16:00 "Economic Development and Emerging Environmental Problems in Bhutan" by Mr. Ngawang Dendup (School of political science and economics, Waseda University)
16:00-16:25 Free Discussion
16:25-16:30 Concluding Remarks by Dr. Kazuo Ando

(*Presentation: 25 minutes, Question & Answer: 5 minutes)


*Open to Researchers and Students


**Free of charge

17th Seminar on Bhutan

17th Seminar on Bhutan "Monarchy And Democracy in Bhutan" / Thurs. 21 July 2016


[Date] Thurs. 21 July 2016

[Time] 17:00-18:30

[Place] Small Seminar Room 1 (3rd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center
    (46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)
    http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/AboutUs/access.html

[Speaker] Karma Tenzin (Researh Fellow, The Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University)

[Title] Monarchy And Democracy in Bhutan

[Abstract]
Bhutan became one of the youngest democracies in the world when it conducted its first parliamentary elections on March 24, 2008, bringing an end to 100 years of absolute monarchy. This transformation of a hermit kingdom, isolated from the rest of the world for the better part of its recent history and ruled by four generations of successive monarchs since 1907, is indeed a milestone. Surprisingly, it was the very institution of monarchy, in particular the fourth King of Bhutan who spearheaded the democratic process, which ultimately paved way for the 2008 parliamentary elections.


Eight years on, people of Bhutan seem to have embraced democracy in true spirit, despite their initial reservation/misgiving about the whole political transition from absolute monarchy to constitutional democracy. The national assembly and the national council are taking the lead in formulating policies, local government elections have empowered people at the grassroots, encouraging them to actively participate in the decision making process, and free press have created a platform for the people to closely follow - and if need be criticize the activities of the government - bringing transparency and accountability.


The institution of monarchy is still at the center of Bhutan's new found polity and its popularity has been growing by the day. What makes Bhutan's democracy unique has been argued by many scholars. Hence, I would like to talk about Bhutan's journey into parliamentary democracy and the role of the king in this new governance, the role of the king and the constitutional provisions guiding the institution of monarchy.


*Open to Researchers and Students

**Free of charge

10th Seminar of Himalayan Religion

10th Seminar of Himalayan Religion
"Traditional Tibetan Buddhist Scholars on Dharma, Law and Politics: philosophical discussions in Boudhanath (Nepal)"


[Date] Fri. 15 July 2016


[Time] 14:00-15:30


[Place] Seminar Room No. 225 (2nd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center
    (46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)
    http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/AboutUs/access.html


[Speaker] Dr. Miguel Alvarez ORTEGA (University of Seville, Department of Philosophy of Law)


[Title] Traditional Tibetan Buddhist Scholars on Dharma, Law and Politics: philosophical discussions in Boudhanath (Nepal)


[Abstract] The legal and political study of Buddhism has predominantly taken the shape of text exegesis or analysis of head figures such as H.H. the Dalai Lama, widely neglecting the question of how normative issues are addressed by the intellectual middle class within the tradition. Exploring the possibilities of such an approach, I carried out a series of in-depth interviews with traditional Tibetan Buddhist scholars in the exile community of Boudhanath (Nepal) covering: the canonical treatment of law and politics; a comparison with the 'Western' paradigm; law and politics in Buddhist countries and social activism and ethics.

A primary analysis of the data points to a heterogeneous picture that challenges common assumptions regarding both the intellectual activities taking place in traditional contexts as well as scholarly interests and philosophical stands on legal and socio-political matters.


*Open to Researchers and Students


**Free of Charge

The First Kyoto Kokoro Initiative Symposium "Kokoro and History"

The First Kyoto Kokoro Initiative Symposium "Kokoro and History"
* The maximum number of applications has been received, and therefore we are no longer accepting applications. (2015/7/30)


Advances in technology and economic globalization have brought about many changes and completely new experiences in human society. There is an increasing need for the human mind to orient itself in this new situation. In April 2015, Kyoto University, with support from the Inamori Foundation, launched the Kyoto Kokoro Initiative, a project focusing on the Japanese concept of kokoro. The Japanese word kokoro has a range of related meanings, often translated variously as "mind," "consciousness," "heart," "spirit," and "soul," among other interpretations. In truth, however, there is no accurately corresponding English term. This Kyoto Kokoro Initiative aims to explore the concept of kokoro and its various connotations in an effort to help us orient our hearts and minds in increasingly complex and changing modern times.

Kokoro-Initiative-symposium1.jpg
(Japanese version only)



Date and times: September 13, 2015 (Sun.) 9:30 - 18:00 (Reception begins at 9:00.)

Venue: Kyoto Hotel Okura, 3F, Suiun banquet hall (Access) (Kawaharamachi-Oike, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto)

Program:
9:30 - 9:50
Opening remarks          Sakiko Yoshikawa (Director, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)
Greeting                       Kazuo Inamori (President, Inamori Foundation)
Congratulatory address  Norifumi Ushio (Director, Scientific Research Institutes Division, Research Promotion Bureau, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology)

9:50 - 11:00 Lecture 1
"The Sturucture and History of Kokoro"
Shinichi Nakazawa (Chief and Professor, Institute for Primitive Science, Meiji University)

11:00 - 12:00 Lecture 2
"The Historical Internalization of Kokoro and Interface"
Toshio Kawai (Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)

12:00 - 13:20 Break

13:20 - 14:20 Lecture 3
"'Kokoro' and Social Design in the Post-Growth Era"
Yoshinori Hiroi (Professor, Faculty of Law, Politics and Economics, Chiba University)

14:20 - 15:20 Lecture 4
"The Implicit Process and 'Personal History': Perception, Evolution, Social Brain"
Shinsuke Shimojo (Professor, Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology)

15:20 - 15:40 Break

15:40 - 16:40 Lecture 5
"The Origin of Kokoro: From Empathy to Ethics"
Juichi Yamagiwa (President, Kyoto University)

16:40 - 17:40 General discussion
Shinichi Nakazawa, Toshio Kawai, Yoshinori Hiroi, Shinsuke Shimojo, Juichi Yamagiwa

17:40 - 18:00 
Summary               Toji Kamata (Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)
Closing remarks      Nagahiro Minato (Executive Vice-President, Kyoto University)

Host: Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University
Support: The Inamori Foundation





Maximum participation: 400 people (by application, in order of arrival of the applications)

Participation fee: Free

Method of application: * The maximum number of applications has been received, and therefore we are no longer accepting applications. (2015/7/30)
Please apply by e-mail or FAX by September 6 (Sun.).
Please clearly state "Application for the 1st Kyoto Kokoro Initiative Symposium" in the subject line, fill in the required matters, and then send it.
* We will contact you only in the event that the maximum number of applications has been received and you cannot participate.
Required matters
(1) Full name (Japanese phonetic pronunciation) (2) Occupation (affiliation) (3) Contact information for a reply (e-mail address)

Contact information / Place for sending an application:
Kyoto University Kokoro Research Center Kyoto Kokoro Initiative Secretariat (weekdays 9:00 - 17:00)
E-mail : kokoro-event*mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp
    (Please change the asterisk (*) to an "at" mark (@). Thank you.)
FAX : 075-753-9680 

The 36th Kokoro Seminar "Death and Dying East and West" / Mon 17 Nov.2014

The 36th Kokoro Seminar / Mon 17 Nov.2014
"Death and Dying East and West"

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A lecture by Tony Walter, PhD.,
Professor and Director of the Centre for Death and Society, The University of Bath, UK


Summary :
What determines how a society manages death and dying? Does it depend on the society's state of economic development: hunter-gatherer, agrarian, industrial, post-industrial? Or does it depend more on national history, laws and culture? How important nowadays are global forces? Or are there distinctive Eastern and Western ways of managing death? This lecture tries to unravel how these different factors interact and shape how people today die, create funeral rites, and mourn.


Date: Mon 17 Nov.2014
Time: 15:30-17:00 (Doors open at 15:00)
Place: Large Conference Room (3rd floor) at Kyoto University Inamori Center
(46 Shimoadachi-cho, Yoshida Sakyo-ku, Kyoto)
http://kokoro.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/AboutUs/access.html


Open to the General Public
Fee: Not required
Remarks: Language English
Supported in part by a grant from The Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education
Inquiries: Liaison Office, Kokoro Research Center
kokoro-liaison*educ.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please change * to @)

Special Lecture by Prof. Xiao-Jing Wang will be held on Mar 28, 2014.

Special Lecture by Prof. Xiao-Jing Wang will be held on Mar 28, 2014 in Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto university.


Date: Friday, March 28th . 4:00 p.m.-
Place: Large Conference Room at Kyoto University Inamori Center (MAP)


Speaker: Xiao-Jing Wang, Ph.D
Provost and Professor at New York University - Shanghai and Professor at Center for Neural Science, New York Univesity, USA
For more information


Title : The prefrontal cortex as a quintessential "cognitive-type" circuit

Abstract :
Kevin Martin and Rodney Douglas and others have proposed that
there is a canonical microcircuit in the mammalian neocortex.
However, even though cortical areas share the same architecture,
quantitatively different properties may give rise to qualitatively
different dynamics and computations. In this talk, I will summarize
a number of works that have given rise to the concept of a "cognitive-
type" cortical microcircuit capable of working memory and decision-
making, in contrast to early sensory processing. I will discuss
experimental tests of this model (mixed selectivity, the role of NMDA
receptors), and open issues (the dynamical nature of persistent
activity). Then, I will show how such local circuits, endowed with
reward-dependent synaptic plasticity, can be used as building blocks
for a variety of higher brain functions, such as rule-based task switching.


Contact: Shintaro Funahashi, Kokoro Research Center; funahashi.shintaro.2z[ at mark] kyoto-u.ac.jp

Lecture by Dr. Shimon Edelman (Cornell University) held on Jan. 7, 2014

Dr. Shimon Edelman, who is the visiting researcher of Kokoro Research Center, spoke about his research at Inamori Center, Kyoto University on Jan 7, 2014.


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Date: Jan 7, 2014, 15:00-17:00
Place: Middle Conference Hall, 3rd Floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University access
Speaker:Shimon Edelman (Department of Psychology at Cornell University)
Title: "Happiness: evolutionary roots, cognitive basis, social dynamics"
Abstract: In this talk, I shall introduce the cognitive-psychological concept of happiness and discuss its likely evolutionary origins, the cognitive mechanisms behind it, and the social dynamics that govern it. I shall also offer some thoughts regarding what can and should be done to promote happiness.


Dr. Edelman's Website
http://kybele.psych.cornell.edu/~edelman/

Dr. Masuda gives a lecture at the 6th Seminar of Anthropology of Education and Learning: Culture, Childhood, and Cognition Venue

Dr. Masuda gives a lecture at the 6th Seminar of Anthropology of Education and Learning: Culture, Childhood, and Cognition Venue on 5th July, 2013 (Friday).


6th Seminar of Anthropology of Education and Learning: Culture, Childhood, and Cognition
Venue: Medium Seminar Room, on 5th July 2013 (Friday), at Inamori Memorial Foundation Building (third floor), Kyoto University


Program


15:00-15:10
1. Introduction
Akira Takada (Kyoto University)


15:10-16:40
The context of early childhood: Family, culture, and policy - family decision making
Marguerite (Peg) Barratt (The George Washington University & Kyoto University)


16:50-18:20
Culture and Attention: Implications for Developmental Research
Takahiko Masuda (University of Alberta)


18:30-20:00
Reception


For more details


Each slot includes talk and discussion. All talks are given in English without translation. Admission free for attending the symposium. For the reception, contribution of \1000-2000 a person will be required.


Financially supported by JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A) "Cultural and ecological foundations of education and learning: An anthropological study on rhythm, imitation, and exchange (Primary Investigator: Akira Takada)"
Co-hosted with 16th Kyoto University African Study Seminar (KUASS)

3rd Lecture on Bhutanese Culture: 56 years of Bhutan with Kyoto University on Apr.16, 2013

3rd Lecture on Bhutanese Culture: 56 years of Bhutan with Kyoto University
- Host organization: Bhutanese Studies, Kokoro Reseach Center, Kyoto University-
         

Date:Apr.16, 2013 17:00-19:00(16:30 Opening)
Place: Large Conference Hall, 3rd Floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University access


Speaker: Yasuyuki KURITA (Professor Emeritus, National Museum of Ethnology)
- Commentator: Ryota SAKAMOTO (Assistant Professor, Hakubi Center for Advanced
Research)
※The lecture will be conducted in Japanese. No translation service will be provided.


3rdBhutanKouza.pngClick to open PDF file.

Kick-off Symposium for MRI Laboratory, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University on Feb. 16, 2013

Kick-off Symposium for MRI Laboratory, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University

Opening a new avenue for brain science - novel knowledge linked to
kokoro and society -


Date: Feb. 16, 2013, 1:00-5:40 pm.
Place: Large Conference Hall, 3rd Floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University access


13:00 - 13:10 Opening Remarks Sakiko Yoshikawa (Director, Kokoro Research Center)
13:10 - 13:20 Guest's Greeting Hiroo Imura (former President of Kyoto University, Foundation for Biomedical Resarch and Innovation)


Special Lectures (Lecture will be given in Japanese)
13:20 - 14:00 Norihiro Sadato(National Institute of Physilogical Sciences, Japan)
"The role of MRI in inter-disciplinary cooperative studies: Cases in social neuroscience"
14:00 - 14:40 Katsuyuki Sakai(The University of Tokyo, Japan)
"Human Prefrontal Cortex and Cognitive Control"
14:40 - 15:20 Manabu Honda(National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Japan)
"Neuroimaging approach to sensibility aspect of SHITSUKAN perception"

15:20 - 15:40 Coffee Break


Special Lectures (Lecture will be given in English)
15:40 - 16:20 Joan Chiao(Northwestern University, U.S.A.)
" Cultural neuroscience: Mapping cultural and genetic diversity in the developing brain"
16:20 - 17:00 Julie Grèzes(Ecole Normale Supérieure, France)
" The interplay between the limbic and the cortical motor systems"
17:00 - 17:40 Shihui Han(Peking University, China)
" How do we understand and share others' pain? The effect of social group relationships"

MRsympo-1.png
click to open PDF file.

Prospective participants:
Target: Researchers and Students
Capacity: 100 seats on a first application
Please apply by e-mail with "Kick-off Symposium application" as the subject, and provide the following details:
1. Full name
2. Affiliation and Post
3. E-mail Address
4. Participation or Non-participation of Party after Symposium (participation fee: 3,000 yen)
Contact / application: Liaison office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University
E-mail: kokoro-event*educ.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please change * to @.)

Lecture by Dr. Arthur Zajonc (Mind and Life Institute, USA) was held on Jan. 25, 2013.

Lecture by Dr. Arthur Zajonc (President, Mind and Life Institute, USA) was held at Kokoro research center on Jan.25.


Title: The Mind and Life Institute: Twenty-five years of Interdisciplinary Dialogue and Research on the Nature of Mind, Consciousness and Reality
Date: Jan. 25, 2013, 4:30-6:00 pm.
Place: Middle Conference Hall, 3rd Floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University access
Target: Researchers and Students (Lecture will be given in English)


Abstract
Since its first interdisciplinary dialogue in 1987 with the Dalai Lama, the Mind & Life Institute has brought together leading neuroscientists, psychologists, physicists, philosophers, ontemplative scholars and practitioners of meditation to consider the nature of the mind,consciousness and reality with the ideal of relieving suffering and promoting human flourishing. Through intensive interdisciplinary dialogues, large conferences, research awards, book publication and an annual summer research institute, the Mind & Life Institute has succeeded in catalyzinghundreds of research projects globally, especially in the emerging area of contemplative neuroscience. Building on its 25 years of success, the Mind & Life Institute is beginning a new phase in its development under the leadership of its new President Arthur Zajonc PhD. who for 30 years workedand published at the intersection of physics, philosophy and contemplative studies. Dr. Zajonc will describe the work of the Mind & Life Institute, especially drawing on his own interdisciplinary research in the experimental foundations of quantum physics, and the work of Mind and Life colleaguesconcerning the neuroscience of meditation and the phenomenology of mind/consciousness. www.mindandlife.org .


Prospective participants:
Please apply by e-mail with "Dr.Zajonc lecture application" as the subject, and provide the following details:
1. Full name
2. Affiliation and Post
Contact / application: Liaison office, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University
E-mail: kokoro-liaison*educ.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Please change * to @.)


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Kokoro Research Center held its 2012 Annual Report Symposium on Dec. 15, 2012.

Kokoro Research Center 2012 Annual Report Symposium
- Studying Kokoro, Considering its Future: Emotion and Body -


Date: December 15, 2012
Place: Middle Conference Hall and Large Conference Hall, Inamori Center, Kyoto University


13:00-13:15 Opening Remarks Sakiko Yoshikawa (Director, Kokoro Research Center)


13:15-14:00 Shintaro Funahashi (Kokoro Research Center, Neuroscience)
Title: What Determines our Preferences?


14:00-14:45 Carl Becker (Kokoro Research Center, Ethics and Comparative Religions)
Title: Nurse Burnout: Influences of Attitude on the Workplace


14:45-15:30 Poster Session(Large Conference Hall)


15:30-16:15 Toji Kamata (Kokoro Research Center, Religious Philosophy and Folklore)
Title: Rethinking the Culture of Shame, from the Kojiki to Ruth Benedict


16:15-16:45 Discussion
Discussant: Dr. Tadafumi Kato(Riken Brain Science Institute, Psychiatry and Brain Science)


16:45-17:30 General Discussion

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↑ Click to open PDF file

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3rd International Symposium on Prefrontal Cortex - Searching for Mechanism of Mind - was held on Nov.29 -30, 2012.

Date: November 29 - 30, 2012
Place: Large Conference Hall, 3rd Floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University


Organizer
Shintaro Funahashi (Kyoto University, Japan)
Satoru Otani (Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6 France)
Yukiori Goto (McGill University, Canada)


Programme

Day 1 (November 29)

9:00-9:05 Opening Remark

Session 1: Cellular and Network Mechanisms of Information Processing in Rodents

9:05-9:45
Satoru Otani (Ryotokuji University, Japan/University of Paris VI, France)
Title: Functional and dysfunctional plasticity inductions in rodent prefrontal cortex

9:45-10:25
Eiichi Jodo (Fukushima Medical University, Japan)
Title: Dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex system in phencyclidine-treated animals as an animal model of schizophrenia

10:25-10:35 Coffee Break

10:35-11:15
Young-A Lee (McGill University, Canada)
Title: Prefrontal cortical alterations by prenatal and postnatal stress interaction

11:15-11:55
Masatoshi Takita (Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Japan)
Title: Neural elements underlying prefrontal functions - Focus on hippocampal-prefrontal pathway

11:55-12:35
Charles Yang (Shanghai Chempartner, China)
Title: Dopamine modulates ion channels that regulate neuronal excitability and repetitive firing to encode forms of plasticity in the prefrontal cortex

12:35-14:00 Lunch

Session 2: Prefrontal Cortical Activity and Cognitive Functions in Primates

14:00-14:40
Shintaro Funahashi (Kyoto University, Japan)
Title: Prefrontal cortex and neural mechanism of executive function

14:40-15:20
Masamichi Sakagami (Tamagawa University)
Title: Reward inference by primate prefrontal and striatal neurons

15:20-15:30 Coffee Break

15:30-16:10
Yoshio Sakurai (Kyoto University)
Title: Dynamic synchrony of firing in the prefrontal cortex in monkeys and rats

16:10-16:50
Yong-Di Zhou  (East China Normal University, China)
Title: Neuronal activity in monkey prefrontal cortex in a visual-haptic cross-modal delay task.

Day 2 (November 30)

9:00-9:40
Mark Buckley (University of Oxford, UK)
Title: Distinguishing the contributions of frontopolar cortex and other prefrontal cortical regions to cognition in the non-human primate

9:40-10:20
Clayton Curtis (New York University, USA)
Title: The role of topographic maps of prioritized space in frontal and parietal cortex.

10:20-10:30 Coffee Break

10:30-11:10
Masaki Isoda (Kansai Medical University, Japan)
Title: Monitoring others' actions in the medial prefrontal cortex of the macaque

11:10-11:50
Masaki Tanaka (Hokkaido University, Japan)
Title: Multiple components of prefrontal signals for covert tracking of moving objects

Session 3: Human Prefrontal Cortical Functions and Dysfunction in Psychiatric Disorders

11:50-12:30
Hidehiko Takahashi (Kyoto University, Japan)
Title: Molecular neuroimaging of the prefrontal functions in human

12:30-14:00 Lunch

14:00-14:40
Michael Nitsche(Georg-August-University, Germany)
Title: Impact of neuromodulators on plasticity in humans

14:40-15:20
Ester Miyuki Nakamura Palacios (University of Espirito-Santo, Brazil)
Title: Neuromodulation of prefrontal cortex activity by direct current stimulation on alcohol and crack-cocaine dependence

15:20-15:30 Coffee Break

15:30-16:10
Naoyuki Osaka (Kyoto University, Japan)
Title: Medial PFC correlates of self in the human brain: an fMRI study

16:10-16:50
Roshan Cools and Quirine Veth (Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherland)
Title: Dopaminergic modulation of frontostriatal function

16:50-17:00 Concluding Remark

3rd_SympoPreCortex.png

Poster PDF(information 1)

Poster PDF(information 2)


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Lecture by Prof. Jeniffer Crocker(Ohio State University) was held on November 1, 2012.

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Date: November 1, 2012 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Place: Large Conference Hall, 3rd Floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University
Moderator: Dr. Yukiko Uchida (Associate Professor, Kokoro Research center,Kyoto Univ.)
Title: The Constructed Self: The Costly Pursuit of Self-Esteem and Other's Regard
Dr. Jeniffer Crocker(Professor and Ohio Eminent Scholar, Ohio State University)

Abstract:People use both intrapersonal and interpersonal strategies to construct a sense of self-worth. Intrapersonally, people attempt to succeed in areas where self-worth is contingent. Interpersonally, they attempt to demonstrate their positive qualities to others so others to have a positive image of them. I will present research suggesting that these strategies may lead to short-term boosts but have long-term costs, because they undermine fundamental human needs for growth and connection―needs that are more effectively met by focusing on giving to others, rather than constructing self-esteem.
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The 2nd Lecture of Bhutanese Culture: "Bhutan Seen Through the Eyes of a Jesuit Missionary: Buddhism and Christianity." - Oct.18, 2012

Date: October 18, 2012 17:00~18:30
Place: Large Conference Hall, 3rd Floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University
(Access Map)
Lecturer: Tshering Tashi (Royal Society for the Protection of Nature: RSPN)
Interpreter and commentator: Yoshiro Imaeda (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique: CNRS)
Commentator: Seiji Kumagai (Kyoto Women's University)
※Lecture held in English and translation to Japanese
Admission/Registration: Free admission (Prior registration required) E-mail: kokoro-event-2*educ.kyoto-u.ac.jp (change * to @)


buhtan1.png(Click to open PDF file)

The 11th Open Lecture "Kokoro no Hiroba" was held on August 18. The title is "The Evolution of 'kokoro': Past, present, and future of the human mind".

2012-09-05no1.pngThe 11th "Kokoro Square" on "The Evolution of 'kokoro': Past, present, and future of the human mind"
Date: August 18, 2012 13:00-16:30
Place: Kokoro Reserch Center, Kyoto University Inamori Hall
Lecturer: IRIKI Atsushi, (Neurobiology, Specially Appointed Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Senior Team Leader, Riken Brain Science Institute) Profile
Title: "Where Kokoro exists: Between body and culture"
Professor UCHIDA Akiko (Anthropology, Faculty of International Research and Education, Waseda University) Profile
Title: "Thinking about the humanity by space-time of evolution."
Moderator: KONDO Reiko (Kokoro Research Center)
Sponsored by Kyoto Prefecture and Kokoro Research Center.
161 participants.

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Lecture by Prof. Adam Gazzaley(University of California) was held on July 30, 2012.

Date: July 30, 2012 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Place: Lecture Room 1102 Faculty of Integrated Human Studies, Kyoto University

Contact: Prof. Shintaro Funahashi (kyoto University Kokoro Research center)

Title: Neural networks underlying top-down modulation of visual processing

Dr. Adam Gazzaley, MD., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry,
Director of Neuroscience Imaging Center, University of California at San Francisco, USA


Abstract:
Top-down modulation is a bi-directional process that underlies our ability to focus our attention on task-relevant stimuli and ignore irrelevant distractions by differentially enhancing or suppressing neural activity in sensory cortical regions. It is believed that this modulation is not an intrinsic property of visual cortices, but is achieved via functional connectivity between sensory brain regions and a distributed network of frontal and parietal regions. I will present new data from our lab that reveals differential entrainment of stimulus-selective, visual association cortical areas with regions of the "frontal-parietal attention network" or the "default network" depending on the participant's goals. Additionally, there is sparse evidence in humans that a direct causal connection exists between prefrontal control regions and visual cortical activity modulation. Using a multi-modal approach that couples fMRI, rTMS and EEG, I will present evidence for a direct role of the inferior frontal junction (IJF) in top-down modulation of feature processing and its influence on subsequent working memory.


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3rd International Symposium on Prefrontal Cortex - Searching for Mechanism of Mind - Nov.29 -30, 2012

Date: November 29 - 30, 2012
Place: Large Conference Hall, 3rd Floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University


Organizer
Shintaro Funahashi (Kyoto University, Japan)
Satoru Otani (Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6 France)
Yukiori Goto (McGill University, Canada)


Programme

Day 1 (November 29)

9:00-9:05 Opening Remark

Session 1: Cellular and Network Mechanisms of Information Processing in Rodents

9:05-9:45
Satoru Otani (Ryotokuji University, Japan/University of Paris VI, France)
Title: Functional and dysfunctional plasticity inductions in rodent prefrontal cortex

9:45-10:25
Eiichi Jodo (Fukushima Medical University, Japan)
Title: Dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex system in phencyclidine-treated animals as an animal model of schizophrenia

10:25-10:35
Coffee Break

10:35-11:15
Young-A Lee (McGill University, Canada)
Title: Prefrontal cortical alterations by prenatal and postnatal stress interaction

11:15-11:55
Masatoshi Takita (Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Japan)
Title: Neural elements underlying prefrontal functions - Focus on hippocampal-prefrontal pathway

11:55-12:35
Charles Yang (Shanghai Chempartner, China)
Title: Dopamine modulates ion channels that regulate neuronal excitability and repetitive firing to encode forms of plasticity in the prefrontal cortex

12:35-14:00 Lunch

Session 2: Prefrontal Cortical Activity and Cognitive Functions in Primates

14:00-14:40
Shintaro Funahashi (Kyoto University, Japan)
Title: Prefrontal cortex and neural mechanism of executive function

14:40-15:20
Masamichi Sakagami (Tamagawa University)
Title: Reward inference by primate prefrontal and striatal neurons

15:20-15:30
Coffee Break

15:30-16:10
Yoshio Sakurai (Kyoto University)
Title: Dynamic synchrony of firing in the prefrontal cortex in monkeys and rats

16:10-16:50
Yong-Di Zhou  (East China Normal University, China)
Title: Neuronal activity in monkey prefrontal cortex in a visual-haptic cross-modal delay task.

Day 2 (November 30)

9:00-9:40
Mark Buckley (University of Oxford, UK)
Title: Distinguishing the contributions of frontopolar cortex and other prefrontal cortical regions to cognition in the non-human primate

9:40-10:20
Clayton Curtis (New York University, USA)
Title: The role of topographic maps of prioritized space in frontal and parietal cortex.

10:20-10:30
Coffee Break

10:30-11:10
Masaki Isoda (Kansai Medical University, Japan)
Title: Monitoring others' actions in the medial prefrontal cortex of the macaque

11:10-11:50
Masaki Tanaka (Hokkaido University, Japan)
Title: Multiple components of prefrontal signals for covert tracking of moving objects

Session 3: Human Prefrontal Cortical Functions and Dysfunction in Psychiatric Disorders

11:50-12:30
Hidehiko Takahashi (Kyoto University, Japan)
Title: Molecular neuroimaging of the prefrontal functions in human

12:30-14:00
Lunch

14:00-14:40
Michael Nitsche(Georg-August-University, Germany)
Title: Impact of neuromodulators on plasticity in humans

14:40-15:20
Ester Miyuki Nakamura Palacios (University of Espirito-Santo, Brazil)
Title: Neuromodulation of prefrontal cortex activity by direct current stimulation on alcohol and crack-cocaine dependence

15:20-15:30
Coffee Break

15:30-16:10
Naoyuki Osaka (Kyoto University, Japan)
Title: Medial PFC correlates of self in the human brain: an fMRI study

16:10-16:50
Roshan Cools and Quirine Veth (Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherland)
Title: Dopaminergic modulation of frontostriatal function

16:50-17:00 Concluding Remark

3rd_SympoPreCortex.png

PosterPDF(information 1)

PoseterPDF(information 2)


inquiry:
Shintaro Funahashi at Kyoto University Kokoro Research Center
E-mail: funahashi.shintaro.2z*kyoto-u.ac.jp(Please change * to @)

Joint workshop of MIDJA(Midlife in Japan) and Kokoro Research Center was held on April 21, 2012. The title is "Culture, well-being, and health".

Date: April 21, 2012 3:00pm-5:00pm
Place: Lecture Room2 Shirankaikan-Bekkan, Kyoto University


Chairman: Prof. Carol Ryff, University of Wisconsin


Prof. Hazel Markus, Stanford University
Title: "How to live a good life in Japan and the U.S."


Prof. Christopher COE, University of Wisconsin
Title: "Lessons from Japan about the worldwide epidemic of diabetes"


Prof. Shinobu Kitayama, University of Michigan/Specially Appointed Professor, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University
Title: "Culture and emotion regulation: Learning from the MIDJA/MIDUS project"


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Workshop on "Culture, Self, and Social Relationships" was held on June 28, 2011.

Place: Large Meeting Room (3rd Floor), Inamori Center, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University
Date: June 28, 2011 3:00p.m. - 6:00p.m.

Program is here. (PDF file)





Symposium "Cultural Strategies for Overcoming Negative Emotions" was held on February 21, 2011.

Symposium "Cultural Strategies for Overcoming Negative Emotions - A cross cultural approach from the perspectives of psychology, religious studies and anthropology"

Date: February 21, 2011 16:00~19:00
Place: Kokoro Reserch Center, Kyoto University Inamori Hall

Program:
1) Keizou Miyasaka (Keio University) 16:00~16:30
Overcoming Deep and Intense Negative Emotion: Laughter as Found in Cultural Tricksters

2) Katsumi Watanabe (The University of Tokyo) 16:30~17:00
"Perceiving the faces of Buddha statues"

half time 17:00~17:10
Takanori Oishi, Ryota Yamaguchi (Kyoto University): Image material showing.

3) Gerald C. Cupchik(University of Toronto) 17:10~18:00
"Under the Gaze of the Buddha: Calming Our Negative Emotions."

4) Discussion 18:00~18:30
Yukiko Uchida (cultural psychology), Kai Hiraishi (evolutionary psychology), Toji Kamata (history of religions)

5) General Discussion (Chairman: Keizou Miyasaka) 18:30~19:00

The 9th Open Lecture "Kokoro Square" was held on January 29, 2011. The title is "'Satoyama' life forms and human kokoro".

The 9th "Kokoro Square" on "'Satoyama' life forms and human kokoro"
Date: January 29, 2011 12:00~16:00
Place: Kokoro Reserch Center, Kyoto University Inamori Hall

Lecturer: Professor Tomoya Akimichi (Ecological Anthropology, Ethno-Biology, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature)

Chairman: Professor Toji Kamata (Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University)

Sponsored by Kyoto Prefecture and Kokoro Research Center.